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Affiliated Faculty

Frances Aparicio

Frances Aparicio

Frances R. Aparicio is Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Director of the Latina and Latino Studies Program at Northwestern University.   She has previously taught at Stanford University, University of Arizona, University of Michigan, and University of Illinois at Chicago.  Her research interests include Latina and Latino literary and cultural studies, the cultural politics of U.S. Latino/a languages, Latino/a popular music and dance, literary and cultural translation, cultural hybridity, transnationalism, Latinidad, and mixed Latino/a identities.  She is author of the award-winning Listening to Salsa:  Gender, Latin Popular Music and Puerto Rican Cultures (Wesleyan 1998), and co-editor of various critical anthologies, including Tropicalizations:  Transcultural Representations of Latinidad (University of New England Press, 1997), Musical Migrations (Palgrave, 2003), and Hibridismos culturales (Revista Iberoamericana, 2006).  A founding editor of the Latinos in Chicago and the Midwest Book Series at the University of Illinois Press, she has facilitated and fostered book publications and new research on Latino/as in the Midwest.  She is currently co-editor of the forthcoming Routledge Companion to Latino/a Literatures (with Suzanne Bost) and is also writing on “intralatino/a subjects,” individuals who are of two or more national Latin American origins.

Ana Arjona

Ana Arjona

Ana Arjona (PhD, Yale University) is an Assistant Professor in political science. She studies political violence and conflict, the foundations of political order, state building, local governance, and the links between crime and politics. Her current research projects investigate the causes and consequences of institutional change and individual agency in contexts of violence. She is the author of Rebelocracy: Social Order in the Colombian Civil War (Cambridge University Press) and co-editor of Rebel Governance in Civil War (Cambridge University Press). Her work focuses on Latin America, especially Colombia, and combines qualitative and quantitative methods.

Pablo J. Boczkowski

Pablo J. Boczkowski

Pablo J. Boczkowski (Ph.D., Cornell University, 2001) is Professor in the Department of Communication Studies, and Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Media and Society in Argentina--a joint initiative between Northwestern University and Universidad de San Andrés (meso.com.ar). His research program examines the transition from print to digital culture. He has written three books, three edited volumes, and over thirty journal articles and twenty book chapters. He is an avid soccer fan and, like his compatriot Francisco, never loses faith in his beloved San Lorenzo de Almagro. 

César Braga-Pinto

César Braga-Pinto

César Braga-Pinto (PhD, University of California Berkeley) specializes in Brazilian and Lusophone African cultures and literatures. He is the author of As Promessas da História: Discursos Proféticos e Assimilação no Brasil Colonial (2003) and the editor of Ligeiros Traços: escritos de juventude de José Lins do Rego (2007). He also co-edited with Fatima Mendonça a  collection of early 20th-century Mozambican journalism writings entitled João Albasini e as luzes de Nwandzenguele: literatura e política em Moçambique 1908-1922 (2014) and À Procura de Saúde: crônicas de um doente/ In Search of Health: chronicles of a sick man (2015).

Lina Britto

Lina Britto

Lina Britto (Ph.D. New York University, 2013) is an historian of modern Latin America and the Caribbean. Her work situates the emergence and consolidation of illegal drug smuggling networks in the Caribbean and Andean regions of Colombia, particularly marijuana, in the context of a growing articulation between the country and the United States during the Cold War.

Sherwin Bryant

Sherwin Bryant

Sherwin K. Bryant (PhD, The Ohio State University) specializes in colonial Latin American history with a particular emphasis upon slavery and emancipation, race and difference, free black life in the Americas, and the modern African Diaspora.

Héctor G. Carrillo

Héctor G. Carrillo

With a focus on Mexico and Mexican immigrants, Héctor Carrillo (Sociology, Gender & Sexuality Studies) investigates the intersections between sexuality, immigration, and health. He also conducts research on the sexualities of non-gay identified men who are sexually attracted to both women and men. At Northwestern, Carrillo teaches courses on the sociology of sexualities, global sexual cultures, sexuality and public policy, and transnationalism. In 2013-14, Prof. Carrillo was the Interim director of the Latina and Latino Studies Program. He currently is co-director of the Sexualities Project at Northwestern (SPAN).

Rifka Cook

Rifka Cook

Rifka Cook (M.A., Universidad Pedagógica Libertador in Linguistics) teaches first- and second-year Spanish language courses. She lived in a Caribbean Island (Margarita) for 20 years and was very involved with the insular community-- both Jewish and non-Jewish groups. In addition, Rifka is a Member of the Language Proficiency Committee (for Spanish language). She received two Residential College Fellow Assistant Research Awards (FARA) 2012-2013 with her project:  “Mafalda and El Chavo: Bridging Worlds” and in 2013-1014 with her project: “Merging the Borderline: music of  Venezuela and the American West”. In 2013 she was among the Technology Innovators Nominees Submitted by Readers – The Chronicle of Higher Education. In 2010-2011 was Faculty Affiliate of the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities . Her research interests and publications include the Judeo-Spanish language, Latin-American culture (Venezuela and the Caribbean), Teaching and learning styles; and using technology in foreign languages classrooms: PPT, Clickers.

Jorge Coronado

Jorge Coronado

Jorge Coronado is Professor of modern Latin American and Andean literatures and cultures at Northwestern University. His undergraduate courses range across the 19th and 20th centuries and draw from various disciplines and cultural practices, such as history, anthropology, music, photography, and literature. His graduate courses focus on two areas: literary and cultural theory and Andean studies.  He has taught in the department of Spanish & Portuguese as well as in Comparative Literary Studies and Latin American & Caribbean Studies, where he is a core faculty member.

He is the author of The Andes Imagined: Indigenismo, Society, and Modernity (Illuminations: Cultural Formations of the Americas series. University of Pittsburgh Press, 2009) and Portraits in the Andes: Photography and Agency, 1900-1950 (Illuminations: Cultural Formations of the Americas series. University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018). A co-edited volume on visual practices in relation to notions of landscape and region entitled Visiones de los Andes. Ensayos críticos sobre el concepto de paisaje y región (Entretejiendo. Crítica y teoría cultural latinoamericana series. Plural Editores and University of Pittsburgh, forthcoming) will appear in 2018 in La Paz. Currently, he is working on two book projects: a manuscript tentatively entitled Lo andino: región, cultura, concepto that explores how the region has cohered in the cultural imagination since the early 19th century, and a study of the strange lettered practices that subalterns produced in early 20th century Latin America by tergiversating intellectuals’ tutelage to their own ends.

He has won funding for research and academic initiatives from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Mellon Foundation, among others. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú and lectured broadly at universities in Latin America, Europe and the United States. At Northwestern, he has been active in building the Department of Spanish & Portuguese and the Latin American & Caribbean Studies Program. He served as Chair of the former for two three-year terms.  He is currently Co-Director of the Andean Cultures & Histories working group (ACH) at the Buffett Institute for Global Studies. He sits on the editorial boards of the PMLA, the Revista de Estudios Hispánicos, and Iberoamericana Vervuert's Los ojos en las manos book series. 

Drew Davies

Drew Davies

Drew Edward Davies (PhD, University of Chicago) researches music and sound in New Spain (colonial Mexico) with attention to issues of transatlantic cultural diffusion and adaptation in cathedral repertoires. He has published and revived the compositions of Santiago Billoni, a Roman composer who worked in 1740s Durango, and frequently collaborates with performing musicians. He also participates in a long term workgroup at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México to catalogue and study colonial manuscripts at Mexico City Cathedral.

Jesús Escobar

Jesús Escobar

Jesús Escobar (PhD, Princeton) is an architectural historian and Chair of the Department of Art History. His research explores the built environment of the early modern Spanish world with publications touching on Spanish cities such as Madrid, Santiago de Compostela, and Seville, as well as other imperial centers such as Lima, Mexico City, Palermo, and Antwerp. His courses at Northwestern consider the breadth of cultural production in the Spanish Habsburg empire from printmaking and painting to architecture and urbanism.

Harris Feinsod

Harris Feinsod

Harris Feinsod (A.B., Brown, Ph.D., Stanford) is Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literary Studies. He teaches 20th and 21st century US and Latin American literature and culture, and his research focuses on poetry and poetics in English and Spanish, modernism and the historical avant-gardes in Europe and the Americas, transnational literary studies (especially hemispheric literary and cultural relations), oceanic studies, and the multiethnic cultures of the US "new west.” He is the author of The Poetry of the Americas: From Good Neighbors to Countercultures (Oxford, 2017), and his writing has appeared in American Literary History, American QuarterlyArcadeCentro, Chicago Review, Iowa ReviewTelos, and the 4th edition of the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (2012), for which he served as an assistant editor. Formerly, he was Geballe Fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center (2010-11), Mellon Fellow at the Harry Ransom Center (summer, 2012), and Early Career Fellow in residence at the University of Pittsburgh Humanities Center (2015-16).

Darío Fernández-Morera

Fernández Morera's (PhD, Harvard University) main fields are Comparative Literature and Golden Age Spanish literature. His writings include books and editions published in Europe and the United States, and articles and review articles in English and Spanish on critical discourses and methodology, cultural issues in Latin America, Spain, and the United States, contemporary political events, modern poetry, the encounter between Europeans and Amerindians, Modernism, Cervantes, Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, and Vicente Aleixandre.

Badi Foster

Badi Foster

    Badi FosterBuffett Institute Visiting Scholar (PhD, Princeton University) has an extremely varied background, extending from higher education and nonprofits to the corporate world and federal government. Born in Chicago, Foster spent his adolescent years in Morocco. He earned his bachelors degree in international relations at the University of Denver and received his PhD in Politics from Princeton University. As a Fulbright fellow, his doctoral research focused on the impact of rapid urbanization in Africa. Foster has held several positions at Harvard University, including Director of Field Experience Program, Graduate School of Education and Assistant Director of the Kennedy Institute of Politics. Foster has also held teaching positions at Princeton University, Rutgers, and the University of Massachusetts. He currently serves on the Advisory Council to the Joan Kroc Center for International Peace Studies at Notre Dame University.  He is a Fellow at the W.E.B. Dubois Institute of African and African American Studies at Harvard University where he continues work on his book length manuscript on leadership and organizational change in the fight against anti Black and anti American Indian racism (1911-2011).

    Marcela A. Fuentes

    Marcela A. Fuentes

    Marcela Fuentes’s work focuses on the relationship between performance and digital technology in late 20th and early 21st century protest and interventionist art. Her book manuscript, In the Event of Performance: Bodies, Tactical Media, and Politics in the Americas, under contract with the University of Michigan Press, investigates the changing relationship between embodied performance and mediation as techniques of control and resistance within neoliberal states. Professor Fuentes’s teaching interests include politics and performance, performance art, social art tactics, transnational performance, theories of embodiment and affect, the digital humanities, and performance as research. Professor Fuentes’s work has been published in academic journals, edited volumes, and reference books. She serves as a Board Member of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics and has been a founding member and Managing Editor of e-misférica, the institute’s online peer-review journal. Professor Fuentes also works as a performer, director, and dramaturg.

    Doris L. Garraway

    Doris L. Garraway

    Doris L. Garraway's research and teaching interests include Francophone Caribbean literature and historiography from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, the Haitian Revolution, early modern French cultures, gender and slavery, postcolonial studies, law, and performance. She is the author of The Libertine Colony: Creolization in the Early French Caribbean (Duke UP, 2005; reprint 2008), and editor of Tree of Liberty: Cultural Legacies of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World (University of Virginia Press, 2008). She has published articles on a range of authors including Marie Chauvet, Aimé Césaire, Patrick Chamoiseau, Denis Diderot, Baron La Hontan, Moreau de Saint-Méry, and various early colonial ethnographers and Haitian revolutionaries in venues such as L’Esprit Créateur, Research in African Literatures, The International Journal of Francophone Studies, Callalou, Romanic Review, Eighteenth-Century Studies, Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century, and in the edited volume The Postcolonial Enlightenment (Oxford UP, 2009). Among her most recent articles draw on her ongoing research on early postrevolutionary Haiti are:  “Black Athena in Haiti: Universal History, Colonization, and the African Origins of Civilization in Postrevolutionary Haitian Writing” in Enlightened Colonialism: Civilization Narratives and Imperial Politics in the Age of Reason, edited by Damien Triocoire (2017); "Print, Publics, and the Scene of Universal Equality in the Kingdom of Henry Christophe,” in a special issue of L’Esprit Créateur 56.1 (Spring 2016) edited by Daniel Désormeaux; and “Empire of Liberty, Kingdom of Civilization: Henry Christophe, Baron de Vastey, and the Paradoxes of Universalism in Postrevolutionary Haiti” in Small Axe16.3 (2012): 1-21. Garraway has been awarded fellowships from Princeton University's Davis Center for Historical Studies, the National Humanities Center, the John Carter Brown Library, and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and she was named the Herman and Beulah Pearce Miller Research Professor at Northwestern for 2011 to 2014, and she was a fellow at Northwestern's Kaplan Center for the Humanities for the academic year 2013-14.

    Edward Gibson

    Edward Gibson

    Professor Gibson's (PhD, Columbia University) research and teaching interests include comparative politics, democratization, Latin American politics, and American Political Development. He is the author of Boundary Control: Subnational Authoritarianism in Federal Democracies (2012).  Boundary Control won the V.O. Key Award for the Best Book on U.S. Southern Politics, as well as the Latin American Studies Association’s Donna Lee Van Cott Award for best book in Latin American Political Institutions.   He is also author of Class and Conservative Parties: Argentina in Comparative Perspective (1996), and editor of Federalism and Democracy in Latin America (2004).  Professor Gibson has won several teaching recognitions, including Northwestern University’s John Deering McCormick Professorship in Teaching Excellence.

    Paul Gillingham

    Paul Gillingham

    Paul Gillingham (D.Phil, Oxford, 2006), is a historian of modern Mexico and Latin America. His first book, Cuauhtémoc's Bones: Forging National Identity in Mexico (University of New Mexico, 2011) examines nationalism through the story of the forged tomb of the last Aztec emperor. He is currently working on three projects: a history of political violence in post-revolutionary Mexico, a national history of Mexico and a co-edited volume on journalism and censorship.

    Mark W. Hauser

    Mark W. Hauser

    Mark is a historical archaeologist who specializes in materiality, slavery and inequality. These key themes intersect in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries Atlantic and Indian Oceans and form a foundation on his research on the African Diaspora and Colonial Contexts. As an archaeologist who studies how people adapt to landscapes of inequality and contribute to those landscapes in material ways he employs ethnohistorical, archaeological, and archaeometric approaches. His current fieldwork is based in the Eastern Caribbean and has focused on the environmental and economic relations developed through colonialism.

    Mei-Ling Hopgood

    Mei-Ling Hopgood

    Mei-Ling Hopgood is a journalist and writer who has written for various publications, ranging from the National Geographic Traveler and Marie Claire to the Miami Herald and the Boston Globe. She has worked as a reporter with the Detroit Free Press, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and in the Cox Newspapers Washington bureau, and has been a recipient of the National Headliner Best in Show, ICIJ Award for Outstanding International Investigative Reporting and several other investigative and enterprise journalism awards. Hopgood worked as a correspondent based in South America for more than seven years, and is the author of Lucky Girl (April 2009) and How Eskimos Keep Their Babies Warm (Feb. 2012). She oversees the Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications  residency program in Argentina, teaches a class in Spanish-English bilingual reporting and storytelling, and has led reporting trips to Argentina, Chile and Nicaragua. 

    Forrest Hylton

    Forrest Hylton

    Forrest Hylton's (Ph.D. New York University, 2010) archival research focuses on indigenous power, politics, culture, and consciousness in the Andes and the Caribbean, where he has lived and worked for over a decade. It spans the colonial and modern periods, and is supplemented by ethnographic fieldwork and documentary filmmaking. His first book manuscript, entitled Reverberations of Insurgency: Indian Communities, the Federal War of 1899, and the Regeneration of Bolivia, explores  indigenous self-government, confederation, and communal land use.  Using a pan-Caribbean perspective that links North and South Atlantic borderlands, as well as Africans, mixed-race people, and Native peoples, his second book project,  Atlantic Homeland: Empire, Law, and Authority in the Guajira Peninsula (New Granada), 1696-1831, argues that Native peoples like the Guajiros grew out of and shaped the Atlantic world, and frequently set the terms of their engagement with it. This approach reverses the conventional optics on colonialism. With Lina Britto, he is co-producer and co-author of  Espíritus Guerreros: La presencia de las luchas del siglo XVIII (Spanish-Wayuunayki with English sub-titles, Universidad de los Andes, 2012/Northwestern University 2014, 38 mins.).

    Lucille Kerr

    Lucille Kerr

    Lucille Kerr (PhD, Yale): 20th century Latin American literature; Boom & post-Boom literary culture; Latin American Jewish literature & history; narrative fiction & theory; fiction & film; testimonial theories & texts; close reading

    Publications:

    Teaching the Latin American Boom
    Editor(s): Lucille Kerr, Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola
    2015

    https://www.mla.org/store/CID44/PID484 

    Laura M. Leon Llerena

    Laura M. Leon Llerena (PhD, Princeton University) specializes in Colonial Latin American Studies, with particular emphasis on Andean history and literature.

    Emily A. Maguire

    Emily A. Maguire

    Emily A. Maguire (Ph.D., New York University, 2004) is Associate Professor of Spanish at Northwestern University, where she specializes in literature of the Hispanic Caribbean. She is affiliated with the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program and the Latino Studies Program. Her book Racial Experiments in Cuban Literature and Ethnography (University Press of Florida, 2011) explores how Cuban writers in the first half of the twentieth century forged a literary space in which to write the nation by drawing from two forms of expression, ethnography and literature, in their re-valorization of Afro-Cuban culture as the source of Cuban-ness. She has published articles on contemporary Caribbean Literature, Afrocubanismo, black internationalism, Latina/o science fiction, Cuban cyberpunk, and Latina/o poetry. She is currently at work on a second book project on science fiction in recent Caribbean narrative.

    James L. Mahoney

    James L. Mahoney

    James Mahoney (PhD, University of California Berkley) Department of Political Science and Department of Sociology Professor Mahoney's interests include comparative-historical research and national development, political regimes, and qualitative methodology.

    Michelle Molina

    Michelle Molina

    J. Michelle  Molina (PhD, University of Chicago) studies the Society of Jesus in the early modern period. Her book, To Overcome Oneself: The Jesuit Ethic and the Spirit of Global Expansion (University of California, 2013) explores Jesuit spirituality in an effort to understand how individuals – both elite and commoner – approached and experienced religious transformation. In particular, she has been interested in examining the impact of the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises – a meditative retreat geared toward self-reform – on early modern global expansion and the development of ideas about self and religious subjectivity in New Spain.

    Paul Ramírez

    Paul Ramírez

    Paul Ramírez (Ph.D., Berkeley) specializes in the history of Mexico in the colonial and early national periods. His book project on epidemics and public health, tentatively titled “Minerva's Children: Mexico's Enlightenment Battle against Epidemic Disease,” examines the colonial rituals and genres that facilitated Mexico's early adoption of preventive medicine. His research has appeared The Americas, Hispanic American Historical Review, and Endeavour, and has been supported by institutions such as the Newberry Library, Notre Dame's Institute for Advanced Study, the Huntington Library, the Mabelle McLeod Lewis Foundation, the University of California’s Institute for Mexico and the U.S. (UC MEXUS), and Harvard’s David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies. He is undertaking research on a new project on the religious dimensions of the harvest and production of salt in Mexico.

    Ramón Rivera-Servera

    Ramón Rivera-Servera

    Ramón H. Rivera-Servera's (PhD, University of Texas-Austin) has research focuses on contemporary (post-1950) performance in North America (Mexico, Canada, and the U.S.) and the Caribbean with special emphasis on the ways categories of race, gender, and sexuality are negotiated in the process of (im)migration. His work documents a wide array of performance practices ranging from theatre and concert dance to social dance, fashion, and speech.

    Cynthia Robin

    Cynthia Robin

    Cynthia Robin is an anthropological archaeologist who studies everyday life, gender, and class in ancient Maya society.  Through her research she strives to show how ordinary people make a difference in society and are not the mere pawns of history or prehistory.  She has just completed a decade long project on the 2000 year history of the ancient Maya farming community of Chan.

    Reuel R. Rogers

    Reuel R. Rogers

    Professor Rogers' (PhD, Princeton University) main interests are in American politics.  His research and teaching focus primarily on race, ethnicity, immigration, urban politics, political behavior, and African-American politics. He is the author of the award winning book, Afro-Caribbean Immigrants and the Politics of Incorporation: Ethnicity, Exception, or Exit (Cambridge University Press 2006).  His current research focuses on black suburbanization.

    Monica Russel y Rodriguez

    Monica Russel y Rodriguez

    Monica Russel y Rodriguez is an ethnographer with broad disciplinary interests that include Anthropology, Latina/o Studies, Ethnic Studies, and Gender Studies. She works primarily with US Latina/o populations and larger questions of representation of Latinas/os in academe, public policy, and the media. Her interests are gender, sexuality, race and class in Latina/o communities.  Her research areas include Los Angeles, Denver, rural New Mexico, and Chicago and the Chicago suburbs.

    Frank Safford

    Frank Safford

    Frank Safford's research deals primarily with economic and political topics in Spanish America in the nineteenth century. Much of his work deals with nineteenth-century Colombia. His most recent publication dealt with the formation of national states in Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Colombia, but he currently is writing a book focusing on the economy and entrepreneurial history in nineteenth-century Colombia.

    Elizabeth Schwall

    Elizabeth Schwall received her Ph.D. in Latin American and Caribbean History from Columbia University in 2016. Her interdisciplinary research and teaching combines History and Dance Studies to shed light on the physical movements that animated daily life, politics, and intellectual inquiry in the region. Her book manuscript, "Political Moves: Dance and Power in Revolutionary Cuba," examines dance as revolutionary politics, labor, and entertainment in Cuba from 1930 to 1990. Her broader research interests include Brazilian History, Latin American performance, Cold War cultural diplomacy, and the histories of migration and community building through art. Her research has appeared in the Hispanic American Historical Review and History of Anthropology Newsletter. She has forthcoming publications in the journals Dance Chronicle and Cuban Studies, and two edited volumes. Her book reviews and encyclopedic entries have appeared in Dance Research Journal, New West Indian Guide/ Nieuwe West-Indische Gids, Cuban Studies, Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism, and the Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro-Latin American Biography.

    Rebecca Seligman

    Rebecca Seligman

    Rebecca Seligman (PhD, Emory University) is a psychological and medical anthropologist whose research has explored the connection between mental health and religious participation in Brazil.  This research examines the ways in which political-economic and social structures of power shape the embodied subjectivities of many Afro-Brazilians in Salvador, capital of the Northeastern state of Bahia, and how participation in the spirit possession religion, Candomblé, positively affects health and well-being of Afro-Brazilian participants by reshaping their embodied selfhood. Her book based on this research is forthcoming.  Seligman’s current research explores the subjective experiences of Mexican youth in psychiatric treatment in the US, and will ultimately include a transnational comparative element examining adolescent psychiatry in Mexico and the US.

    Publications:

    Possessing Spirits and Healing Selves: Embodiment and Transformation in an Afro-Brazilian Religion. Culture, Mind, and Society Series, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.

    Krista Thompson

    Krista Thompson

    Krista Thompson (PhD, Emory University) is in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University. She researches and teaches the art and visual culture in the Africa diaspora, with an emphasis on photography. She is author of An Eye for the Tropics (2006) and articles in American Art, Art Bulletin, Art Journal, Representations, The Drama Review, and Small Axe. Thompson, the recipient of fellowships and grants from the J. Paul Getty Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the Warhol foundation, is working on The Visual Economy of Light in African Diasporic Aesthetic Practice (forthcoming, Duke University Press) on the intersections among black vernacular forms of photography, performance practices, and contemporary art in the Caribbean and the United States and The Evidence of Things Not Photographed, a book that examines notions of photographic absence and disappearance in colonial and postcolonial Jamaica.

    Alejandra Uslenghi

    Alejandra Uslenghi

    Alejandra Uslenghi (PhD, New York University) specializes in 19th and 20th century Latin American Literature with an emphasis on visual culture and comparative modernisms studies. Other research interests include: travel narratives, theory of photography, geopolitics of modernism.

    Mary Weismantel

    Mary Weismantel
    Professor, Department of Anthropology, Program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Mary Weismantel (PhD, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign). Professor Weismantel's research areas and interests include cultural anthropology, sex/gender, and race; her area of research and teaching expertise is Latin America generally and the Andean region in particular. Professor Weismantel is currently writing about sexuality, death, and the relationship between humans and animals as themes in the art of the ancient Moche, who created thousands of remarkable ceramics on the north coast of Peru between 200 and 800 C.E.
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