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The Andes

Lina Britto

Lina Britto

Program Area(s):  Caribbean; The Andes

Lina Britto (Ph.D. New York University, 2013) is an historian of modern Latin America and the Caribbean. Her work situates the emergence and consolidation of illegal drug smuggling networks in the Caribbean and Andean regions of Colombia, particularly marijuana, in the context of a growing articulation between the country and the United States during the Cold War.

Jorge Coronado

Jorge Coronado

Program Area(s):  Literature; Art and Architecture; The Andes

Jorge Coronado is Professor of modern Latin American and Andean literatures and cultures at Northwestern University. His undergraduate courses range across the 19th and 20th centuries and draw from various disciplines and cultural practices, such as history, anthropology, music, photography, and literature. His graduate courses focus on two areas: literary and cultural theory and Andean studies.  He has taught in the department of Spanish & Portuguese as well as in Comparative Literary Studies and Latin American & Caribbean Studies, where he is a core faculty member.

He is the author of The Andes Imagined: Indigenismo, Society, and Modernity (Illuminations: Cultural Formations of the Americas series. University of Pittsburgh Press, 2009) and Portraits in the Andes: Photography and Agency, 1900-1950 (Illuminations: Cultural Formations of the Americas series. University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018). A co-edited volume on visual practices in relation to notions of landscape and region entitled Visiones de los Andes. Ensayos críticos sobre el concepto de paisaje y región (Entretejiendo. Crítica y teoría cultural latinoamericana series. Plural Editores and University of Pittsburgh, forthcoming) will appear in 2018 in La Paz. Currently, he is working on two book projects: a manuscript tentatively entitled Lo andino: región, cultura, concepto that explores how the region has cohered in the cultural imagination since the early 19th century, and a study of the strange lettered practices that subalterns produced in early 20th century Latin America by tergiversating intellectuals’ tutelage to their own ends.

He has won funding for research and academic initiatives from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Mellon Foundation, among others. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú and lectured broadly at universities in Latin America, Europe and the United States. At Northwestern, he has been active in building the Department of Spanish & Portuguese and the Latin American & Caribbean Studies Program. He served as Chair of the former for two three-year terms.  He is currently Co-Director of the Andean Cultures & Histories working group (ACH) at the Buffett Institute for Global Studies. He sits on the editorial boards of the PMLA, the Revista de Estudios Hispánicos, and Iberoamericana Vervuert's Los ojos en las manos book series. 

Mei-Ling Hopgood

Mei-Ling Hopgood

Program Area(s):  Literature; The Andes

Mei-Ling Hopgood is a journalist and writer who has written for various publications, ranging from the National Geographic Traveler and Marie Claire to the Miami Herald and the Boston Globe. She has worked as a reporter with the Detroit Free Press, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and in the Cox Newspapers Washington bureau, and has been a recipient of the National Headliner Best in Show, ICIJ Award for Outstanding International Investigative Reporting and several other investigative and enterprise journalism awards. Hopgood worked as a correspondent based in South America for more than seven years, and is the author of Lucky Girl (April 2009) and How Eskimos Keep Their Babies Warm (Feb. 2012). She oversees the Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications  residency program in Argentina, teaches a class in Spanish-English bilingual reporting and storytelling, and has led reporting trips to Argentina, Chile and Nicaragua. 

Laura M. Leon Llerena

Program Area(s):  Religion; The Andes; Literature; Colonialism; Race

Laura M. Leon Llerena (PhD, Princeton University) specializes in Colonial Latin American Studies, with particular emphasis on Andean history and literature.

Mary Weismantel

Mary Weismantel

Program Area(s):  The Andes; Gender and Sexuality; Race; Archaeology; Ethnography

Professor, Department of Anthropology, Program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Mary Weismantel (PhD, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign). Professor Weismantel's research areas and interests include cultural anthropology, sex/gender, and race; her area of research and teaching expertise is Latin America generally and the Andean region in particular. Professor Weismantel is currently writing about sexuality, death, and the relationship between humans and animals as themes in the art of the ancient Moche, who created thousands of remarkable ceramics on the north coast of Peru between 200 and 800 C.E.
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