The Andes

Maria Akchurin

Program Area(s):  Transnationalism/Globalization; Politics; The Andes

Maria Akchurin, Buffett Postdoctoral Fellow, is a sociologist studying political processes around social and environmental policies in Latin America. Her dissertation research compares the privatization of urban water supply systems in Argentina and Chile from the late 1980s to the present, analyzing the implementation of the market paradigm in water and sanitation as well as social mobilization around water. In another recent project, she analyzed how the rights of nature were introduced into the Ecuadorian constitution. Her broader interests are in political sociology and mobilization, economy and society, and historical sociology.

Lina Britto

Lina Britto

Program Area(s):  Caribbean; The Andes

Lina Britto (Ph.D. New York University, 2013) is an historian of modern Latin America and the Caribbean. Her work situates the emergence and consolidation of illegal drug smuggling networks in the Caribbean and Andean regions of Colombia, particularly marijuana, in the context of a growing articulation between the country and the United States during the Cold War.

Jorge Coronado

Jorge Coronado

Program Area(s):  Literature; Art and Architecture; The Andes

Jorge Coronado specializes in modern Latin American and Andean literatures and cultures. His undergraduate courses range across the 19th and 20th centuries and draw from various disciplines and cultural practices, such as history, anthropology, music, film, photography, and literature. His graduate courses focus on two areas: literary and cultural theory and Andean studies.  He has taught in the department of Spanish & Portuguese as well as in Comparative Literary Studies and Latin American & Caribbean Studies, where he is a core faculty member.

His book, entitled The Andes Imagined: Indigenismo, Society, and Modernity, appeared in the Illuminations Series at the University of Pittsburgh Press in 2009. He has written and published widely on indigenismo, photography, and the avant-garde. He has recently completed Andean Portraits: Photography, Consumption, Agency, 1900-1950 (forthcoming 2017, University of Pittsburgh Press), a study of photographic portraits and culture in the southern Andes.  Currently, he is working on two book projects: a co-edited volume entitled Visiones de los Andes. Ensayos críticos sobre el concepto de paisaje y región en los Andes and a single-author manuscript tentatively entitled Lo andino: región, cultura, concepto that explores how the Andes has cohered in the cultural imagination since the early 19th century. 

He has won funding for research and academic initiatives from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Mellon Foundation, among others. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú and lectured broadly at universities in Latin America, Europe and the United States. At Northwestern, he has been active in building the Department of Spanish & Portuguese and the Latin American & Caribbean Studies Program.  He is currently Co-Director of the Andean Cultures & Histories working group (ACH) at the Buffett Institute for Global Studies.

Mei-Ling Hopgood

Mei-Ling Hopgood

Program Area(s):  Literature; The Andes

Mei-Ling Hopgood is a journalist and writer who has written for various publications, ranging from the National Geographic Traveler and Marie Claire to the Miami Herald and the Boston Globe. She has worked as a reporter with the Detroit Free Press, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and in the Cox Newspapers Washington bureau, and has been a recipient of the National Headliner Best in Show, ICIJ Award for Outstanding International Investigative Reporting and several other investigative and enterprise journalism awards. Hopgood worked as a correspondent based in South America for more than seven years, and is the author of Lucky Girl (April 2009) and How Eskimos Keep Their Babies Warm (Feb. 2012). She oversees the Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications  residency program in Argentina, teaches a class in Spanish-English bilingual reporting and storytelling, and has led reporting trips to Argentina, Chile and Nicaragua. 

Laura M. Leon Llerena

Program Area(s):  Religion; The Andes; Literature; Colonialism; Race

Laura M. Leon Llerena (PhD, Princeton University) specializes in Colonial Latin American Studies, with particular emphasis on Andean history and literature.

Mary Weismantel

Mary Weismantel

Program Area(s):  The Andes; Gender and Sexuality; Race; Archaeology; Ethnography

Professor, Department of Anthropology, Program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Mary Weismantel (PhD, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign). Professor Weismantel's research areas and interests include cultural anthropology, sex/gender, and race; her area of research and teaching expertise is Latin America generally and the Andean region in particular. Professor Weismantel is currently writing about sexuality, death, and the relationship between humans and animals as themes in the art of the ancient Moche, who created thousands of remarkable ceramics on the north coast of Peru between 200 and 800 C.E.