Art & Architecture

Jorge Coronado

Jorge Coronado

Program Area(s):  Literature; Art and Architecture; The Andes

Jorge Coronado specializes in modern Latin American and Andean literatures and cultures. His undergraduate courses range across the 19th and 20th centuries and draw from various disciplines and cultural practices, such as history, anthropology, music, film, photography, and literature. His graduate courses focus on two areas: literary and cultural theory and Andean studies.  He has taught in the department of Spanish & Portuguese as well as in Comparative Literary Studies and Latin American & Caribbean Studies, where he is a core faculty member.

His book, entitled The Andes Imagined: Indigenismo, Society, and Modernity, appeared in the Illuminations Series at the University of Pittsburgh Press in 2009. He has written and published widely on indigenismo, photography, and the avant-garde. He has recently completed Andean Portraits: Photography, Consumption, Agency, 1900-1950 (forthcoming 2017, University of Pittsburgh Press), a study of photographic portraits and culture in the southern Andes.  Currently, he is working on two book projects: a co-edited volume entitled Visiones de los Andes. Ensayos críticos sobre el concepto de paisaje y región en los Andes and a single-author manuscript tentatively entitled Lo andino: región, cultura, concepto that explores how the Andes has cohered in the cultural imagination since the early 19th century. 

He has won funding for research and academic initiatives from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Mellon Foundation, among others. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú and lectured broadly at universities in Latin America, Europe and the United States. At Northwestern, he has been active in building the Department of Spanish & Portuguese and the Latin American & Caribbean Studies Program.  He is currently Co-Director of the Andean Cultures & Histories working group (ACH) at the Buffett Institute for Global Studies.

Jesús Escobar

Jesús Escobar

Program Area(s):  Art and Architecture; Transnationalism/Globalization; Atlantic World

Jesús Escobar (PhD, Princeton) is an architectural historian and Chair of the Department of Art History. His research explores the built environment of the early modern Spanish world with publications touching on Spanish cities such as Madrid, Santiago de Compostela, and Seville, as well as other imperial centers such as Lima, Mexico City, Palermo, and Antwerp. His courses at Northwestern consider the breadth of cultural production in the Spanish Habsburg empire from printmaking and painting to architecture and urbanism.

Ramón Rivera-Servera

Ramón Rivera-Servera

Program Area(s):  Immigration/Emigration; Art and Architecture; Race; Gender and Sexuality; Ethnography

Ramón H. Rivera-Servera's (PhD, University of Texas-Austin) has research focuses on contemporary (post-1950) performance in North America (Mexico, Canada, and the U.S.) and the Caribbean with special emphasis on the ways categories of race, gender, and sexuality are negotiated in the process of (im)migration. His work documents a wide array of performance practices ranging from theatre and concert dance to social dance, fashion, and speech.

Elizabeth Schwall

Program Area(s):  Gender and Sexuality; History; Race; Ethnography; Mexico and Central America; Art and Architecture; Brazil

Elizabeth Schwall received her Ph.D. in Latin American and Caribbean History from Columbia University in 2016. Her interdisciplinary research and teaching combines History and Dance Studies to shed light on the physical movements that animated daily life, politics, and intellectual inquiry in the region. Her book manuscript, "Political Moves: Dance and Power in Revolutionary Cuba," examines dance as revolutionary politics, labor, and entertainment in Cuba from 1930 to 1990. Her broader research interests include Brazilian History, Latin American performance, Cold War cultural diplomacy, and the histories of migration and community building through art. Her research has appeared in the Hispanic American Historical Review and History of Anthropology Newsletter. She has forthcoming publications in the journals Dance Chronicle and Cuban Studies, and two edited volumes. Her book reviews and encyclopedic entries have appeared in Dance Research Journal, New West Indian Guide/ Nieuwe West-Indische Gids, Cuban Studies, Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism, and the Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro-Latin American Biography.

Krista Thompson

Krista Thompson

Program Area(s):  African Diaspora; Art and Architecture

Krista Thompson (PhD, Emory University) is in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University. She researches and teaches the art and visual culture in the Africa diaspora, with an emphasis on photography. She is author of An Eye for the Tropics (2006) and articles in American Art, Art Bulletin, Art Journal, Representations, The Drama Review, and Small Axe. Thompson, the recipient of fellowships and grants from the J. Paul Getty Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the Warhol foundation, is working on The Visual Economy of Light in African Diasporic Aesthetic Practice (forthcoming, Duke University Press) on the intersections among black vernacular forms of photography, performance practices, and contemporary art in the Caribbean and the United States and The Evidence of Things Not Photographed, a book that examines notions of photographic absence and disappearance in colonial and postcolonial Jamaica.

Alejandra Uslenghi

Alejandra Uslenghi

Program Area(s):  Literature; Art and Architecture

Alejandra Uslenghi (PhD, New York University) specializes in 19th and 20th century Latin American Literature with an emphasis on visual culture and comparative modernisms studies. Other research interests include: travel narratives, theory of photography, geopolitics of modernism.