Caribbean

Lina Britto

Lina Britto

Program Area(s):  Caribbean; The Andes

Lina Britto (Ph.D. New York University, 2013) is an historian of modern Latin America and the Caribbean. Her work situates the emergence and consolidation of illegal drug smuggling networks in the Caribbean and Andean regions of Colombia, particularly marijuana, in the context of a growing articulation between the country and the United States during the Cold War.

Rifka Cook

Rifka Cook

Program Area(s):  Immigration/Emigration; Music; Caribbean

Rifka Cook (M.A., Universidad Pedagógica Libertador in Linguistics) teaches first- and second-year Spanish language courses. She lived in a Caribbean Island (Margarita) for 20 years and was very involved with the insular community-- both Jewish and non-Jewish groups. In addition, Rifka is a Member of the Language Proficiency Committee (for Spanish language). She received two Residential College Fellow Assistant Research Awards (FARA) 2012-2013 with her project:  “Mafalda and El Chavo: Bridging Worlds” and in 2013-1014 with her project: “Merging the Borderline: music of  Venezuela and the American West”. In 2013 she was among the Technology Innovators Nominees Submitted by Readers – The Chronicle of Higher Education. In 2010-2011 was Faculty Affiliate of the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities . Her research interests and publications include the Judeo-Spanish language, Latin-American culture (Venezuela and the Caribbean), Teaching and learning styles; and using technology in foreign languages classrooms: PPT, Clickers.

Doris L. Garraway

Doris L. Garraway

Program Area(s):  History; Caribbean; Literature

Doris L. Garraway's research and teaching interests include Francophone Caribbean literature and historiography from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, the Haitian Revolution, early modern French cultures, gender and slavery, postcolonial studies, law, and performance. She is the author of The Libertine Colony: Creolization in the Early French Caribbean (Duke UP, 2005; reprint 2008), and editor of Tree of Liberty: Cultural Legacies of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World (University of Virginia Press, 2008). She has published articles on a range of authors including Marie Chauvet, Aimé Césaire, Patrick Chamoiseau, Denis Diderot, Baron La Hontan, Moreau de Saint-Méry, and various early colonial ethnographers and Haitian revolutionaries in venues such as L’Esprit Créateur, Research in African Literatures, The International Journal of Francophone Studies, Callalou, Romanic Review, Eighteenth-Century Studies, Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century, and in the edited volume The Postcolonial Enlightenment (Oxford UP, 2009). Among her most recent articles draw on her ongoing research on early postrevolutionary Haiti are:  “Black Athena in Haiti: Universal History, Colonization, and the African Origins of Civilization in Postrevolutionary Haitian Writing” in Enlightened Colonialism: Civilization Narratives and Imperial Politics in the Age of Reason, edited by Damien Triocoire (2017); "Print, Publics, and the Scene of Universal Equality in the Kingdom of Henry Christophe,” in a special issue of L’Esprit Créateur 56.1 (Spring 2016) edited by Daniel Désormeaux; and “Empire of Liberty, Kingdom of Civilization: Henry Christophe, Baron de Vastey, and the Paradoxes of Universalism in Postrevolutionary Haiti” in Small Axe16.3 (2012): 1-21. Garraway has been awarded fellowships from Princeton University's Davis Center for Historical Studies, the National Humanities Center, the John Carter Brown Library, and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and she was named the Herman and Beulah Pearce Miller Research Professor at Northwestern for 2011 to 2014, and she was a fellow at Northwestern's Kaplan Center for the Humanities for the academic year 2013-14.

Paul Gillingham

Paul Gillingham

Program Area(s):  Caribbean; Mexico and Central America

Paul Gillingham (D.Phil, Oxford, 2006), is a historian of modern Mexico and Latin America. His first book, Cuauhtémoc's Bones: Forging National Identity in Mexico (University of New Mexico, 2011) examines nationalism through the story of the forged tomb of the last Aztec emperor. He is currently working on three projects: a history of political violence in post-revolutionary Mexico, a national history of Mexico and a co-edited volume on journalism and censorship.

Mark W. Hauser

Mark W. Hauser

Program Area(s):  Atlantic World; Archaeology; African Diaspora; Caribbean

Mark is a historical archaeologist who specializes in materiality, slavery and inequality. These key themes intersect in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries Atlantic and Indian Oceans and form a foundation on his research on the African Diaspora and Colonial Contexts. As an archaeologist who studies how people adapt to landscapes of inequality and contribute to those landscapes in material ways he employs ethnohistorical, archaeological, and archaeometric approaches. His current fieldwork is based in the Eastern Caribbean and has focused on the environmental and economic relations developed through colonialism.

Forrest Hylton

Forrest Hylton

Program Area(s):  Caribbean

Forrest Hylton's (Ph.D. New York University, 2010) archival research focuses on indigenous power, politics, culture, and consciousness in the Andes and the Caribbean, where he has lived and worked for over a decade. It spans the colonial and modern periods, and is supplemented by ethnographic fieldwork and documentary filmmaking. His first book manuscript, entitled Reverberations of Insurgency: Indian Communities, the Federal War of 1899, and the Regeneration of Bolivia, explores  indigenous self-government, confederation, and communal land use.  Using a pan-Caribbean perspective that links North and South Atlantic borderlands, as well as Africans, mixed-race people, and Native peoples, his second book project,  Atlantic Homeland: Empire, Law, and Authority in the Guajira Peninsula (New Granada), 1696-1831, argues that Native peoples like the Guajiros grew out of and shaped the Atlantic world, and frequently set the terms of their engagement with it. This approach reverses the conventional optics on colonialism. With Lina Britto, he is co-producer and co-author of  Espíritus Guerreros: La presencia de las luchas del siglo XVIII (Spanish-Wayuunayki with English sub-titles, Universidad de los Andes, 2012/Northwestern University 2014, 38 mins.).

Emily A. Maguire

Emily A. Maguire

Program Area(s):  Caribbean; Race; Ethnography; Literature

Emily A. Maguire (Ph.D., New York University, 2004) is Associate Professor of Spanish at Northwestern University, where she specializes in literature of the Hispanic Caribbean. She is affiliated with the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program and the Latino Studies Program. Her book Racial Experiments in Cuban Literature and Ethnography (University Press of Florida, 2011) explores how Cuban writers in the first half of the twentieth century forged a literary space in which to write the nation by drawing from two forms of expression, ethnography and literature, in their re-valorization of Afro-Cuban culture as the source of Cuban-ness. She has published articles on contemporary Caribbean Literature, Afrocubanismo, black internationalism, Latina/o science fiction, Cuban cyberpunk, and Latina/o poetry. She is currently at work on a second book project on science fiction in recent Caribbean narrative.