Colonialism

Sherwin Bryant

Sherwin Bryant

Program Area(s):  Colonialism; African Diaspora; Race; History; Atlantic World

Sherwin K. Bryant (PhD, The Ohio State University) specializes in colonial Latin American history with a particular emphasis upon slavery and emancipation, race and difference, free black life in the Americas, and the modern African Diaspora.

Drew Davies

Drew Davies

Program Area(s):  Music; Colonialism; Atlantic World

Drew Edward Davies (PhD, University of Chicago) researches music and sound in New Spain (colonial Mexico) with attention to issues of transatlantic cultural diffusion and adaptation in cathedral repertoires. He has published and revived the compositions of Santiago Billoni, a Roman composer who worked in 1740s Durango, and frequently collaborates with performing musicians. He also participates in a long term workgroup at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México to catalogue and study colonial manuscripts at Mexico City Cathedral.

Laura M. Leon Llerena

Program Area(s):  Religion; The Andes; Literature; Colonialism; Race

Laura M. Leon Llerena (PhD, Princeton University) specializes in Colonial Latin American Studies, with particular emphasis on Andean history and literature.

Michelle Molina

Michelle Molina

Program Area(s):  Colonialism; Transnationalism/Globalization; History; Mexico and Central America; Religion; Atlantic World

J. Michelle  Molina (PhD, University of Chicago) studies the Society of Jesus in the early modern period. Her book, To Overcome Oneself: The Jesuit Ethic and the Spirit of Global Expansion (University of California, 2013) explores Jesuit spirituality in an effort to understand how individuals – both elite and commoner – approached and experienced religious transformation. In particular, she has been interested in examining the impact of the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises – a meditative retreat geared toward self-reform – on early modern global expansion and the development of ideas about self and religious subjectivity in New Spain.

Paul Ramírez

Paul Ramírez

Program Area(s):  Mexico and Central America; Public Health; Atlantic World; History; Religion; Colonialism

Paul Ramírez (Ph.D., Berkeley) specializes in the history of Mexico in the colonial and early national periods. His book project on epidemics and public health, tentatively titled “Minerva's Children: Mexico's Enlightenment Battle against Epidemic Disease,” examines the colonial rituals and genres that facilitated Mexico's early adoption of preventive medicine. His research has appeared The Americas, Hispanic American Historical Review, and Endeavour, and has been supported by institutions such as the Newberry Library, Notre Dame's Institute for Advanced Study, the Huntington Library, the Mabelle McLeod Lewis Foundation, the University of California’s Institute for Mexico and the U.S. (UC MEXUS), and Harvard’s David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies. He is undertaking research on a new project on the religious dimensions of the harvest and production of salt in Mexico.