Ethnography

Pablo J. Boczkowski

Pablo J. Boczkowski

Program Area(s):  Ethnography; Politics

Pablo J. Boczkowski (Ph.D., Cornell University, 2001) is Professor in the Department of Communication Studies, and Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Media and Society in Argentina--a joint initiative between Northwestern University and Universidad de San Andrés (meso.com.ar). His research program examines the transition from print to digital culture. He has written three books, three edited volumes, and over thirty journal articles and twenty book chapters. He is an avid soccer fan and, like his compatriot Francisco, never loses faith in his beloved San Lorenzo de Almagro. 

Emily A. Maguire

Emily A. Maguire

Program Area(s):  Caribbean; Race; Ethnography; Literature

Emily A. Maguire (Ph.D., New York University, 2004) is Associate Professor of Spanish at Northwestern University, where she specializes in literature of the Hispanic Caribbean. She is affiliated with the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program and the Latino Studies Program. Her book Racial Experiments in Cuban Literature and Ethnography (University Press of Florida, 2011) explores how Cuban writers in the first half of the twentieth century forged a literary space in which to write the nation by drawing from two forms of expression, ethnography and literature, in their re-valorization of Afro-Cuban culture as the source of Cuban-ness. She has published articles on contemporary Caribbean Literature, Afrocubanismo, black internationalism, Latina/o science fiction, Cuban cyberpunk, and Latina/o poetry. She is currently at work on a second book project on science fiction in recent Caribbean narrative.

Ramón Rivera-Servera

Ramón Rivera-Servera

Program Area(s):  Immigration/Emigration; Art and Architecture; Race; Gender and Sexuality; Ethnography

Ramón H. Rivera-Servera's (PhD, University of Texas-Austin) has research focuses on contemporary (post-1950) performance in North America (Mexico, Canada, and the U.S.) and the Caribbean with special emphasis on the ways categories of race, gender, and sexuality are negotiated in the process of (im)migration. His work documents a wide array of performance practices ranging from theatre and concert dance to social dance, fashion, and speech.

Elizabeth Schwall

Program Area(s):  Gender and Sexuality; History; Race; Ethnography; Mexico and Central America; Art and Architecture; Brazil

Elizabeth Schwall received her Ph.D. in Latin American and Caribbean History from Columbia University in 2016. Her interdisciplinary research and teaching combines History and Dance Studies to shed light on the physical movements that animated daily life, politics, and intellectual inquiry in the region. Her book manuscript, "Political Moves: Dance and Power in Revolutionary Cuba," examines dance as revolutionary politics, labor, and entertainment in Cuba from 1930 to 1990. Her broader research interests include Brazilian History, Latin American performance, Cold War cultural diplomacy, and the histories of migration and community building through art. Her research has appeared in the Hispanic American Historical Review and History of Anthropology Newsletter. She has forthcoming publications in the journals Dance Chronicle and Cuban Studies, and two edited volumes. Her book reviews and encyclopedic entries have appeared in Dance Research Journal, New West Indian Guide/ Nieuwe West-Indische Gids, Cuban Studies, Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism, and the Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro-Latin American Biography.

Rebecca Seligman

Rebecca Seligman

Program Area(s):  Brazil; Religion; Immigration/Emigration; Ethnography

Rebecca Seligman (PhD, Emory University) is a psychological and medical anthropologist whose research has explored the connection between mental health and religious participation in Brazil.  This research examines the ways in which political-economic and social structures of power shape the embodied subjectivities of many Afro-Brazilians in Salvador, capital of the Northeastern state of Bahia, and how participation in the spirit possession religion, Candomblé, positively affects health and well-being of Afro-Brazilian participants by reshaping their embodied selfhood. Her book based on this research is forthcoming.  Seligman’s current research explores the subjective experiences of Mexican youth in psychiatric treatment in the US, and will ultimately include a transnational comparative element examining adolescent psychiatry in Mexico and the US.

Publications:

Possessing Spirits and Healing Selves: Embodiment and Transformation in an Afro-Brazilian Religion. Culture, Mind, and Society Series, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.

Mary Weismantel

Mary Weismantel

Program Area(s):  The Andes; Gender and Sexuality; Race; Archaeology; Ethnography

Professor, Department of Anthropology, Program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Mary Weismantel (PhD, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign). Professor Weismantel's research areas and interests include cultural anthropology, sex/gender, and race; her area of research and teaching expertise is Latin America generally and the Andean region in particular. Professor Weismantel is currently writing about sexuality, death, and the relationship between humans and animals as themes in the art of the ancient Moche, who created thousands of remarkable ceramics on the north coast of Peru between 200 and 800 C.E.