History

Sherwin Bryant

Sherwin Bryant

Program Area(s):  Colonialism; African Diaspora; Race; History; Atlantic World

Sherwin K. Bryant (PhD, The Ohio State University) specializes in colonial Latin American history with a particular emphasis upon slavery and emancipation, race and difference, free black life in the Americas, and the modern African Diaspora.

Héctor G. Carrillo

Héctor G. Carrillo

Program Area(s):  Gender and Sexuality; Transnationalism/Globalization; History; Public Health; Immigration/Emigration

With a focus on Mexico and Mexican immigrants, Héctor Carrillo (Sociology, Gender & Sexuality Studies) investigates the intersections between sexuality, immigration, and health. He also conducts research on the sexualities of non-gay identified men who are sexually attracted to both women and men. At Northwestern, Carrillo teaches courses on the sociology of sexualities, global sexual cultures, sexuality and public policy, and transnationalism. In 2013-14, Prof. Carrillo was the Interim director of the Latina and Latino Studies Program. He currently is co-director of the Sexualities Project at Northwestern (SPAN).

Doris L. Garraway

Doris L. Garraway

Program Area(s):  History; Caribbean; Literature

Doris L. Garraway's research and teaching interests include Francophone Caribbean literature and historiography from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, the Haitian Revolution, early modern French cultures, gender and slavery, postcolonial studies, law, and performance. She is the author of The Libertine Colony: Creolization in the Early French Caribbean (Duke UP, 2005; reprint 2008), and editor of Tree of Liberty: Cultural Legacies of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World (University of Virginia Press, 2008). She has published articles on a range of authors including Marie Chauvet, Aimé Césaire, Patrick Chamoiseau, Denis Diderot, Baron La Hontan, Moreau de Saint-Méry, and various early colonial ethnographers and Haitian revolutionaries in venues such as L’Esprit Créateur, Research in African Literatures, The International Journal of Francophone Studies, Callalou, Romanic Review, Eighteenth-Century Studies, Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century, and in the edited volume The Postcolonial Enlightenment (Oxford UP, 2009). Among her most recent articles draw on her ongoing research on early postrevolutionary Haiti are:  “Black Athena in Haiti: Universal History, Colonization, and the African Origins of Civilization in Postrevolutionary Haitian Writing” in Enlightened Colonialism: Civilization Narratives and Imperial Politics in the Age of Reason, edited by Damien Triocoire (2017); "Print, Publics, and the Scene of Universal Equality in the Kingdom of Henry Christophe,” in a special issue of L’Esprit Créateur 56.1 (Spring 2016) edited by Daniel Désormeaux; and “Empire of Liberty, Kingdom of Civilization: Henry Christophe, Baron de Vastey, and the Paradoxes of Universalism in Postrevolutionary Haiti” in Small Axe16.3 (2012): 1-21. Garraway has been awarded fellowships from Princeton University's Davis Center for Historical Studies, the National Humanities Center, the John Carter Brown Library, and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and she was named the Herman and Beulah Pearce Miller Research Professor at Northwestern for 2011 to 2014, and she was a fellow at Northwestern's Kaplan Center for the Humanities for the academic year 2013-14.

Lucille Kerr

Lucille Kerr

Program Area(s):  History; Religion; Literature

Lucille Kerr (PhD, Yale): 20th century Latin American literature; Boom & post-Boom literary culture; Latin American Jewish literature & history; narrative fiction & theory; fiction & film; testimonial theories & texts; close reading

Publications:

Teaching the Latin American Boom
Editor(s): Lucille Kerr, Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola
2015

https://www.mla.org/store/CID44/PID484 

James L. Mahoney

James L. Mahoney

Program Area(s):  History; Politics

James Mahoney (PhD, University of California Berkley) Department of Political Science and Department of Sociology Professor Mahoney's interests include comparative-historical research and national development, political regimes, and qualitative methodology.

Michelle Molina

Michelle Molina

Program Area(s):  Colonialism; Transnationalism/Globalization; History; Mexico and Central America; Religion; Atlantic World

J. Michelle  Molina (PhD, University of Chicago) studies the Society of Jesus in the early modern period. Her book, To Overcome Oneself: The Jesuit Ethic and the Spirit of Global Expansion (University of California, 2013) explores Jesuit spirituality in an effort to understand how individuals – both elite and commoner – approached and experienced religious transformation. In particular, she has been interested in examining the impact of the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises – a meditative retreat geared toward self-reform – on early modern global expansion and the development of ideas about self and religious subjectivity in New Spain.

Paul Ramírez

Paul Ramírez

Program Area(s):  Mexico and Central America; Public Health; Atlantic World; History; Religion; Colonialism

Paul Ramírez (Ph.D., Berkeley) specializes in the history of Mexico in the colonial and early national periods. His book project on epidemics and public health, tentatively titled “Minerva's Children: Mexico's Enlightenment Battle against Epidemic Disease,” examines the colonial rituals and genres that facilitated Mexico's early adoption of preventive medicine. His research has appeared The Americas, Hispanic American Historical Review, and Endeavour, and has been supported by institutions such as the Newberry Library, Notre Dame's Institute for Advanced Study, the Huntington Library, the Mabelle McLeod Lewis Foundation, the University of California’s Institute for Mexico and the U.S. (UC MEXUS), and Harvard’s David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies. He is undertaking research on a new project on the religious dimensions of the harvest and production of salt in Mexico.

Frank Safford

Frank Safford

Program Area(s):  History; Politics

Frank Safford's research deals primarily with economic and political topics in Spanish America in the nineteenth century. Much of his work deals with nineteenth-century Colombia. His most recent publication dealt with the formation of national states in Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Colombia, but he currently is writing a book focusing on the economy and entrepreneurial history in nineteenth-century Colombia.

Elizabeth Schwall

Program Area(s):  Gender and Sexuality; History; Race; Ethnography; Mexico and Central America; Art and Architecture; Brazil

Elizabeth Schwall received her Ph.D. in Latin American and Caribbean History from Columbia University in 2016. Her interdisciplinary research and teaching combines History and Dance Studies to shed light on the physical movements that animated daily life, politics, and intellectual inquiry in the region. Her book manuscript, "Political Moves: Dance and Power in Revolutionary Cuba," examines dance as revolutionary politics, labor, and entertainment in Cuba from 1930 to 1990. Her broader research interests include Brazilian History, Latin American performance, Cold War cultural diplomacy, and the histories of migration and community building through art. Her research has appeared in the Hispanic American Historical Review and History of Anthropology Newsletter. She has forthcoming publications in the journals Dance Chronicle and Cuban Studies, and two edited volumes. Her book reviews and encyclopedic entries have appeared in Dance Research Journal, New West Indian Guide/ Nieuwe West-Indische Gids, Cuban Studies, Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism, and the Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro-Latin American Biography.