Immigration/Emigration

Frances Aparicio

Frances Aparicio

Program Area(s):  Music; Immigration/Emigration; Transnationalism/Globalization; Literature

Frances R. Aparicio is Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Director of the Latina and Latino Studies Program at Northwestern University.   She has previously taught at Stanford University, University of Arizona, University of Michigan, and University of Illinois at Chicago.  Her research interests include Latina and Latino literary and cultural studies, the cultural politics of U.S. Latino/a languages, Latino/a popular music and dance, literary and cultural translation, cultural hybridity, transnationalism, Latinidad, and mixed Latino/a identities.  She is author of the award-winning Listening to Salsa:  Gender, Latin Popular Music and Puerto Rican Cultures (Wesleyan 1998), and co-editor of various critical anthologies, including Tropicalizations:  Transcultural Representations of Latinidad (University of New England Press, 1997), Musical Migrations (Palgrave, 2003), and Hibridismos culturales (Revista Iberoamericana, 2006).  A founding editor of the Latinos in Chicago and the Midwest Book Series at the University of Illinois Press, she has facilitated and fostered book publications and new research on Latino/as in the Midwest.  She is currently co-editor of the forthcoming Routledge Companion to Latino/a Literatures (with Suzanne Bost) and is also writing on “intralatino/a subjects,” individuals who are of two or more national Latin American origins.

Héctor G. Carrillo

Héctor G. Carrillo

Program Area(s):  Gender and Sexuality; Transnationalism/Globalization; History; Public Health; Immigration/Emigration

With a focus on Mexico and Mexican immigrants, Héctor Carrillo (Sociology, Gender & Sexuality Studies) investigates the intersections between sexuality, immigration, and health. He also conducts research on the sexualities of non-gay identified men who are sexually attracted to both women and men. At Northwestern, Carrillo teaches courses on the sociology of sexualities, global sexual cultures, sexuality and public policy, and transnationalism. In 2013-14, Prof. Carrillo was the Interim director of the Latina and Latino Studies Program. He currently is co-director of the Sexualities Project at Northwestern (SPAN).

Rifka Cook

Rifka Cook

Program Area(s):  Immigration/Emigration; Music; Caribbean

Rifka Cook (M.A., Universidad Pedagógica Libertador in Linguistics) teaches first- and second-year Spanish language courses. She lived in a Caribbean Island (Margarita) for 20 years and was very involved with the insular community-- both Jewish and non-Jewish groups. In addition, Rifka is a Member of the Language Proficiency Committee (for Spanish language). She received two Residential College Fellow Assistant Research Awards (FARA) 2012-2013 with her project:  “Mafalda and El Chavo: Bridging Worlds” and in 2013-1014 with her project: “Merging the Borderline: music of  Venezuela and the American West”. In 2013 she was among the Technology Innovators Nominees Submitted by Readers – The Chronicle of Higher Education. In 2010-2011 was Faculty Affiliate of the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities . Her research interests and publications include the Judeo-Spanish language, Latin-American culture (Venezuela and the Caribbean), Teaching and learning styles; and using technology in foreign languages classrooms: PPT, Clickers.

Marcela A. Fuentes

Marcela A. Fuentes

Program Area(s):  Literature; Transnationalism/Globalization; Immigration/Emigration; Music; Politics

Marcela Fuentes’s work focuses on the relationship between performance and digital technology in late 20th and early 21st century protest and interventionist art. Her book manuscript, In the Event of Performance: Bodies, Tactical Media, and Politics in the Americas, under contract with the University of Michigan Press, investigates the changing relationship between embodied performance and mediation as techniques of control and resistance within neoliberal states. Professor Fuentes’s teaching interests include politics and performance, performance art, social art tactics, transnational performance, theories of embodiment and affect, the digital humanities, and performance as research. Professor Fuentes’s work has been published in academic journals, edited volumes, and reference books. She serves as a Board Member of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics and has been a founding member and Managing Editor of e-misférica, the institute’s online peer-review journal. Professor Fuentes also works as a performer, director, and dramaturg.

Ramón Rivera-Servera

Ramón Rivera-Servera

Program Area(s):  Immigration/Emigration; Art and Architecture; Race; Gender and Sexuality; Ethnography

Ramón H. Rivera-Servera's (PhD, University of Texas-Austin) has research focuses on contemporary (post-1950) performance in North America (Mexico, Canada, and the U.S.) and the Caribbean with special emphasis on the ways categories of race, gender, and sexuality are negotiated in the process of (im)migration. His work documents a wide array of performance practices ranging from theatre and concert dance to social dance, fashion, and speech.

Reuel R. Rogers

Reuel R. Rogers

Program Area(s):  Politics; Immigration/Emigration; Race

Professor Rogers' (PhD, Princeton University) main interests are in American politics.  His research and teaching focus primarily on race, ethnicity, immigration, urban politics, political behavior, and African-American politics. He is the author of the award winning book, Afro-Caribbean Immigrants and the Politics of Incorporation: Ethnicity, Exception, or Exit (Cambridge University Press 2006).  His current research focuses on black suburbanization.

Monica Russel y Rodriguez

Monica Russel y Rodriguez

Program Area(s):  Gender and Sexuality; Immigration/Emigration

Monica Russel y Rodriguez is an ethnographer with broad disciplinary interests that include Anthropology, Latina/o Studies, Ethnic Studies, and Gender Studies. She works primarily with US Latina/o populations and larger questions of representation of Latinas/os in academe, public policy, and the media. Her interests are gender, sexuality, race and class in Latina/o communities.  Her research areas include Los Angeles, Denver, rural New Mexico, and Chicago and the Chicago suburbs.

Rebecca Seligman

Rebecca Seligman

Program Area(s):  Brazil; Religion; Immigration/Emigration; Ethnography

Rebecca Seligman (PhD, Emory University) is a psychological and medical anthropologist whose research has explored the connection between mental health and religious participation in Brazil.  This research examines the ways in which political-economic and social structures of power shape the embodied subjectivities of many Afro-Brazilians in Salvador, capital of the Northeastern state of Bahia, and how participation in the spirit possession religion, Candomblé, positively affects health and well-being of Afro-Brazilian participants by reshaping their embodied selfhood. Her book based on this research is forthcoming.  Seligman’s current research explores the subjective experiences of Mexican youth in psychiatric treatment in the US, and will ultimately include a transnational comparative element examining adolescent psychiatry in Mexico and the US.

Publications:

Possessing Spirits and Healing Selves: Embodiment and Transformation in an Afro-Brazilian Religion. Culture, Mind, and Society Series, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.