Literature

Frances Aparicio

Frances Aparicio

Program Area(s):  Music; Immigration/Emigration; Transnationalism/Globalization; Literature

Frances R. Aparicio is Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Director of the Latina and Latino Studies Program at Northwestern University.   She has previously taught at Stanford University, University of Arizona, University of Michigan, and University of Illinois at Chicago.  Her research interests include Latina and Latino literary and cultural studies, the cultural politics of U.S. Latino/a languages, Latino/a popular music and dance, literary and cultural translation, cultural hybridity, transnationalism, Latinidad, and mixed Latino/a identities.  She is author of the award-winning Listening to Salsa:  Gender, Latin Popular Music and Puerto Rican Cultures (Wesleyan 1998), and co-editor of various critical anthologies, including Tropicalizations:  Transcultural Representations of Latinidad (University of New England Press, 1997), Musical Migrations (Palgrave, 2003), and Hibridismos culturales (Revista Iberoamericana, 2006).  A founding editor of the Latinos in Chicago and the Midwest Book Series at the University of Illinois Press, she has facilitated and fostered book publications and new research on Latino/as in the Midwest.  She is currently co-editor of the forthcoming Routledge Companion to Latino/a Literatures (with Suzanne Bost) and is also writing on “intralatino/a subjects,” individuals who are of two or more national Latin American origins.

César Braga-Pinto

César Braga-Pinto

Program Area(s):  Brazil; Literature

César Braga-Pinto (PhD, University of California Berkeley) specializes in Brazilian and Lusophone African cultures and literatures. He is the author of As Promessas da História: Discursos Proféticos e Assimilação no Brasil Colonial (2003) and the editor of Ligeiros Traços: escritos de juventude de José Lins do Rego (2007). He also co-edited with Fatima Mendonça a  collection of early 20th-century Mozambican journalism writings entitled João Albasini e as luzes de Nwandzenguele: literatura e política em Moçambique 1908-1922 (2014) and À Procura de Saúde: crônicas de um doente/ In Search of Health: chronicles of a sick man (2015).

Jorge Coronado

Jorge Coronado

Program Area(s):  Literature; Art and Architecture; The Andes

Jorge Coronado specializes in modern Latin American and Andean literatures and cultures. His undergraduate courses range across the 19th and 20th centuries and draw from various disciplines and cultural practices, such as history, anthropology, music, film, photography, and literature. His graduate courses focus on two areas: literary and cultural theory and Andean studies.  He has taught in the department of Spanish & Portuguese as well as in Comparative Literary Studies and Latin American & Caribbean Studies, where he is a core faculty member.

His book, entitled The Andes Imagined: Indigenismo, Society, and Modernity, appeared in the Illuminations Series at the University of Pittsburgh Press in 2009. He has written and published widely on indigenismo, photography, and the avant-garde. He has recently completed Andean Portraits: Photography, Consumption, Agency, 1900-1950 (forthcoming 2017, University of Pittsburgh Press), a study of photographic portraits and culture in the southern Andes.  Currently, he is working on two book projects: a co-edited volume entitled Visiones de los Andes. Ensayos críticos sobre el concepto de paisaje y región en los Andes and a single-author manuscript tentatively entitled Lo andino: región, cultura, concepto that explores how the Andes has cohered in the cultural imagination since the early 19th century. 

He has won funding for research and academic initiatives from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Mellon Foundation, among others. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú and lectured broadly at universities in Latin America, Europe and the United States. At Northwestern, he has been active in building the Department of Spanish & Portuguese and the Latin American & Caribbean Studies Program.  He is currently Co-Director of the Andean Cultures & Histories working group (ACH) at the Buffett Institute for Global Studies.

Harris Feinsod

Harris Feinsod

Program Area(s):  Literature

Harris Feinsod (A.B., Brown, Ph.D., Stanford) is Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literary Studies. He teaches 20th and 21st century US and Latin American literature and culture, and his research focuses on poetry and poetics in English and Spanish, modernism and the historical avant-gardes in Europe and the Americas, transnational literary studies (especially hemispheric literary and cultural relations), oceanic studies, and the multiethnic cultures of the US "new west.” He is the author of The Poetry of the Americas: From Good Neighbors to Countercultures (Oxford, 2017), and his writing has appeared in American Literary History, American QuarterlyArcadeCentro, Chicago Review, Iowa ReviewTelos, and the 4th edition of the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (2012), for which he served as an assistant editor. Formerly, he was Geballe Fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center (2010-11), Mellon Fellow at the Harry Ransom Center (summer, 2012), and Early Career Fellow in residence at the University of Pittsburgh Humanities Center (2015-16).

Darío Fernández-Morera

Program Area(s):  Literature

Fernández Morera's (PhD, Harvard University) main fields are Comparative Literature and Golden Age Spanish literature. His writings include books and editions published in Europe and the United States, and articles and review articles in English and Spanish on critical discourses and methodology, cultural issues in Latin America, Spain, and the United States, contemporary political events, modern poetry, the encounter between Europeans and Amerindians, Modernism, Cervantes, Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, and Vicente Aleixandre.

Marcela A. Fuentes

Marcela A. Fuentes

Program Area(s):  Literature; Transnationalism/Globalization; Immigration/Emigration; Music; Politics

Marcela Fuentes’s work focuses on the relationship between performance and digital technology in late 20th and early 21st century protest and interventionist art. Her book manuscript, In the Event of Performance: Bodies, Tactical Media, and Politics in the Americas, under contract with the University of Michigan Press, investigates the changing relationship between embodied performance and mediation as techniques of control and resistance within neoliberal states. Professor Fuentes’s teaching interests include politics and performance, performance art, social art tactics, transnational performance, theories of embodiment and affect, the digital humanities, and performance as research. Professor Fuentes’s work has been published in academic journals, edited volumes, and reference books. She serves as a Board Member of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics and has been a founding member and Managing Editor of e-misférica, the institute’s online peer-review journal. Professor Fuentes also works as a performer, director, and dramaturg.

Doris L. Garraway

Doris L. Garraway

Program Area(s):  History; Caribbean; Literature

Doris L. Garraway's research and teaching interests include Francophone Caribbean literature and historiography from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, the Haitian Revolution, early modern French cultures, gender and slavery, postcolonial studies, law, and performance. She is the author of The Libertine Colony: Creolization in the Early French Caribbean (Duke UP, 2005; reprint 2008), and editor of Tree of Liberty: Cultural Legacies of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World (University of Virginia Press, 2008). She has published articles on a range of authors including Marie Chauvet, Aimé Césaire, Patrick Chamoiseau, Denis Diderot, Baron La Hontan, Moreau de Saint-Méry, and various early colonial ethnographers and Haitian revolutionaries in venues such as L’Esprit Créateur, Research in African Literatures, The International Journal of Francophone Studies, Callalou, Romanic Review, Eighteenth-Century Studies, Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century, and in the edited volume The Postcolonial Enlightenment (Oxford UP, 2009). Among her most recent articles draw on her ongoing research on early postrevolutionary Haiti are:  “Black Athena in Haiti: Universal History, Colonization, and the African Origins of Civilization in Postrevolutionary Haitian Writing” in Enlightened Colonialism: Civilization Narratives and Imperial Politics in the Age of Reason, edited by Damien Triocoire (2017); "Print, Publics, and the Scene of Universal Equality in the Kingdom of Henry Christophe,” in a special issue of L’Esprit Créateur 56.1 (Spring 2016) edited by Daniel Désormeaux; and “Empire of Liberty, Kingdom of Civilization: Henry Christophe, Baron de Vastey, and the Paradoxes of Universalism in Postrevolutionary Haiti” in Small Axe16.3 (2012): 1-21. Garraway has been awarded fellowships from Princeton University's Davis Center for Historical Studies, the National Humanities Center, the John Carter Brown Library, and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and she was named the Herman and Beulah Pearce Miller Research Professor at Northwestern for 2011 to 2014, and she was a fellow at Northwestern's Kaplan Center for the Humanities for the academic year 2013-14.

Mei-Ling Hopgood

Mei-Ling Hopgood

Program Area(s):  Literature; The Andes

Mei-Ling Hopgood is a journalist and writer who has written for various publications, ranging from the National Geographic Traveler and Marie Claire to the Miami Herald and the Boston Globe. She has worked as a reporter with the Detroit Free Press, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and in the Cox Newspapers Washington bureau, and has been a recipient of the National Headliner Best in Show, ICIJ Award for Outstanding International Investigative Reporting and several other investigative and enterprise journalism awards. Hopgood worked as a correspondent based in South America for more than seven years, and is the author of Lucky Girl (April 2009) and How Eskimos Keep Their Babies Warm (Feb. 2012). She oversees the Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications  residency program in Argentina, teaches a class in Spanish-English bilingual reporting and storytelling, and has led reporting trips to Argentina, Chile and Nicaragua. 

Lucille Kerr

Lucille Kerr

Program Area(s):  History; Religion; Literature

Lucille Kerr (PhD, Yale): 20th century Latin American literature; Boom & post-Boom literary culture; Latin American Jewish literature & history; narrative fiction & theory; fiction & film; testimonial theories & texts; close reading

Publications:

Teaching the Latin American Boom
Editor(s): Lucille Kerr, Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola
2015

https://www.mla.org/store/CID44/PID484 

Laura M. Leon Llerena

Program Area(s):  Religion; The Andes; Literature; Colonialism; Race

Laura M. Leon Llerena (PhD, Princeton University) specializes in Colonial Latin American Studies, with particular emphasis on Andean history and literature.

Emily A. Maguire

Emily A. Maguire

Program Area(s):  Caribbean; Race; Ethnography; Literature

Emily A. Maguire (Ph.D., New York University, 2004) is Associate Professor of Spanish at Northwestern University, where she specializes in literature of the Hispanic Caribbean. She is affiliated with the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program and the Latino Studies Program. Her book Racial Experiments in Cuban Literature and Ethnography (University Press of Florida, 2011) explores how Cuban writers in the first half of the twentieth century forged a literary space in which to write the nation by drawing from two forms of expression, ethnography and literature, in their re-valorization of Afro-Cuban culture as the source of Cuban-ness. She has published articles on contemporary Caribbean Literature, Afrocubanismo, black internationalism, Latina/o science fiction, Cuban cyberpunk, and Latina/o poetry. She is currently at work on a second book project on science fiction in recent Caribbean narrative.

Alejandra Uslenghi

Alejandra Uslenghi

Program Area(s):  Literature; Art and Architecture

Alejandra Uslenghi (PhD, New York University) specializes in 19th and 20th century Latin American Literature with an emphasis on visual culture and comparative modernisms studies. Other research interests include: travel narratives, theory of photography, geopolitics of modernism.