Race

Sherwin Bryant

Sherwin Bryant

Program Area(s):  Colonialism; African Diaspora; Race; History; Atlantic World

Sherwin K. Bryant (PhD, The Ohio State University) specializes in colonial Latin American history with a particular emphasis upon slavery and emancipation, race and difference, free black life in the Americas, and the modern African Diaspora.

Laura M. Leon Llerena

Program Area(s):  Religion; The Andes; Literature; Colonialism; Race

Laura M. Leon Llerena (PhD, Princeton University) specializes in Colonial Latin American Studies, with particular emphasis on Andean history and literature.

Emily A. Maguire

Emily A. Maguire

Program Area(s):  Caribbean; Race; Ethnography; Literature

Emily A. Maguire (Ph.D., New York University, 2004) is Associate Professor of Spanish at Northwestern University, where she specializes in literature of the Hispanic Caribbean. She is affiliated with the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program and the Latino Studies Program. Her book Racial Experiments in Cuban Literature and Ethnography (University Press of Florida, 2011) explores how Cuban writers in the first half of the twentieth century forged a literary space in which to write the nation by drawing from two forms of expression, ethnography and literature, in their re-valorization of Afro-Cuban culture as the source of Cuban-ness. She has published articles on contemporary Caribbean Literature, Afrocubanismo, black internationalism, Latina/o science fiction, Cuban cyberpunk, and Latina/o poetry. She is currently at work on a second book project on science fiction in recent Caribbean narrative.

Ramón Rivera-Servera

Ramón Rivera-Servera

Program Area(s):  Immigration/Emigration; Art and Architecture; Race; Gender and Sexuality; Ethnography

Ramón H. Rivera-Servera's (PhD, University of Texas-Austin) has research focuses on contemporary (post-1950) performance in North America (Mexico, Canada, and the U.S.) and the Caribbean with special emphasis on the ways categories of race, gender, and sexuality are negotiated in the process of (im)migration. His work documents a wide array of performance practices ranging from theatre and concert dance to social dance, fashion, and speech.

Reuel R. Rogers

Reuel R. Rogers

Program Area(s):  Politics; Immigration/Emigration; Race

Professor Rogers' (PhD, Princeton University) main interests are in American politics.  His research and teaching focus primarily on race, ethnicity, immigration, urban politics, political behavior, and African-American politics. He is the author of the award winning book, Afro-Caribbean Immigrants and the Politics of Incorporation: Ethnicity, Exception, or Exit (Cambridge University Press 2006).  His current research focuses on black suburbanization.

Elizabeth Schwall

Program Area(s):  Gender and Sexuality; History; Race; Ethnography; Mexico and Central America; Art and Architecture; Brazil

Elizabeth Schwall received her Ph.D. in Latin American and Caribbean History from Columbia University in 2016. Her interdisciplinary research and teaching combines History and Dance Studies to shed light on the physical movements that animated daily life, politics, and intellectual inquiry in the region. Her book manuscript, "Political Moves: Dance and Power in Revolutionary Cuba," examines dance as revolutionary politics, labor, and entertainment in Cuba from 1930 to 1990. Her broader research interests include Brazilian History, Latin American performance, Cold War cultural diplomacy, and the histories of migration and community building through art. Her research has appeared in the Hispanic American Historical Review and History of Anthropology Newsletter. She has forthcoming publications in the journals Dance Chronicle and Cuban Studies, and two edited volumes. Her book reviews and encyclopedic entries have appeared in Dance Research Journal, New West Indian Guide/ Nieuwe West-Indische Gids, Cuban Studies, Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism, and the Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro-Latin American Biography.

Mary Weismantel

Mary Weismantel

Program Area(s):  The Andes; Gender and Sexuality; Race; Archaeology; Ethnography

Professor, Department of Anthropology, Program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Mary Weismantel (PhD, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign). Professor Weismantel's research areas and interests include cultural anthropology, sex/gender, and race; her area of research and teaching expertise is Latin America generally and the Andean region in particular. Professor Weismantel is currently writing about sexuality, death, and the relationship between humans and animals as themes in the art of the ancient Moche, who created thousands of remarkable ceramics on the north coast of Peru between 200 and 800 C.E.