Religion

Lucille Kerr

Lucille Kerr

Program Area(s):  History; Religion; Literature

Lucille Kerr (PhD, Yale): 20th century Latin American literature; Boom & post-Boom literary culture; Latin American Jewish literature & history; narrative fiction & theory; fiction & film; testimonial theories & texts; close reading

Publications:

Teaching the Latin American Boom
Editor(s): Lucille Kerr, Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola
2015

https://www.mla.org/store/CID44/PID484 

Laura M. Leon Llerena

Program Area(s):  Religion; The Andes; Literature; Colonialism; Race

Laura M. Leon Llerena (PhD, Princeton University) specializes in Colonial Latin American Studies, with particular emphasis on Andean history and literature.

Michelle Molina

Michelle Molina

Program Area(s):  Colonialism; Transnationalism/Globalization; History; Mexico and Central America; Religion; Atlantic World

J. Michelle  Molina (PhD, University of Chicago) studies the Society of Jesus in the early modern period. Her book, To Overcome Oneself: The Jesuit Ethic and the Spirit of Global Expansion (University of California, 2013) explores Jesuit spirituality in an effort to understand how individuals – both elite and commoner – approached and experienced religious transformation. In particular, she has been interested in examining the impact of the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises – a meditative retreat geared toward self-reform – on early modern global expansion and the development of ideas about self and religious subjectivity in New Spain.

Paul Ramírez

Paul Ramírez

Program Area(s):  Mexico and Central America; Public Health; Atlantic World; History; Religion; Colonialism

Paul Ramírez (Ph.D., Berkeley) specializes in the history of Mexico in the colonial and early national periods. His book project on epidemics and public health, tentatively titled “Minerva's Children: Mexico's Enlightenment Battle against Epidemic Disease,” examines the colonial rituals and genres that facilitated Mexico's early adoption of preventive medicine. His research has appeared The Americas, Hispanic American Historical Review, and Endeavour, and has been supported by institutions such as the Newberry Library, Notre Dame's Institute for Advanced Study, the Huntington Library, the Mabelle McLeod Lewis Foundation, the University of California’s Institute for Mexico and the U.S. (UC MEXUS), and Harvard’s David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies. He is undertaking research on a new project on the religious dimensions of the harvest and production of salt in Mexico.

Rebecca Seligman

Rebecca Seligman

Program Area(s):  Brazil; Religion; Immigration/Emigration; Ethnography

Rebecca Seligman (PhD, Emory University) is a psychological and medical anthropologist whose research has explored the connection between mental health and religious participation in Brazil.  This research examines the ways in which political-economic and social structures of power shape the embodied subjectivities of many Afro-Brazilians in Salvador, capital of the Northeastern state of Bahia, and how participation in the spirit possession religion, Candomblé, positively affects health and well-being of Afro-Brazilian participants by reshaping their embodied selfhood. Her book based on this research is forthcoming.  Seligman’s current research explores the subjective experiences of Mexican youth in psychiatric treatment in the US, and will ultimately include a transnational comparative element examining adolescent psychiatry in Mexico and the US.

Publications:

Possessing Spirits and Healing Selves: Embodiment and Transformation in an Afro-Brazilian Religion. Culture, Mind, and Society Series, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.