African Diaspora

Sherwin Bryant

Sherwin Bryant

Program Area(s):  Colonialism; African Diaspora; Race; History; Atlantic World

Sherwin K. Bryant (PhD, The Ohio State University) specializes in colonial Latin American history with a particular emphasis upon slavery and emancipation, race and difference, free black life in the Americas, and the modern African Diaspora.

Mark W. Hauser

Mark W. Hauser

Program Area(s):  Atlantic World; Archaeology; African Diaspora; Caribbean

Mark is a historical archaeologist who specializes in materiality, slavery and inequality. These key themes intersect in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries Atlantic and Indian Oceans and form a foundation on his research on the African Diaspora and Colonial Contexts. As an archaeologist who studies how people adapt to landscapes of inequality and contribute to those landscapes in material ways he employs ethnohistorical, archaeological, and archaeometric approaches. His current fieldwork is based in the Eastern Caribbean and has focused on the environmental and economic relations developed through colonialism.

Krista Thompson

Krista Thompson

Program Area(s):  African Diaspora; Art and Architecture

Krista Thompson (PhD, Emory University) is in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University. She researches and teaches the art and visual culture in the Africa diaspora, with an emphasis on photography. She is author of An Eye for the Tropics (2006) and articles in American Art, Art Bulletin, Art Journal, Representations, The Drama Review, and Small Axe. Thompson, the recipient of fellowships and grants from the J. Paul Getty Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the Warhol foundation, is working on The Visual Economy of Light in African Diasporic Aesthetic Practice (forthcoming, Duke University Press) on the intersections among black vernacular forms of photography, performance practices, and contemporary art in the Caribbean and the United States and The Evidence of Things Not Photographed, a book that examines notions of photographic absence and disappearance in colonial and postcolonial Jamaica.