Affiliated Faculty

Pablo J. Boczkowski

Pablo J. Boczkowski
Pablo J. Boczkowski (PhD, Cornell University) obtained his Ph.D. in the Department of Science and Technology Studies at Cornell University in 2001, under the direction of Trevor Pinch. Prior to joining Northwestern in 2005 he was Cecil and Ida Green Career Development Assistant Professor of Organization Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management. His research program looks at the transition from print to digital media, with a focus on the organizational and occupational dynamics of contemporary journalism and increasingly examined by adopting a comparative lens. He is the author of Digitizing the News: Innovation in Online Newspapers (MIT Press, 2004); News at Work: Imitation in an Age of Information Abundance (University of Chicago Press, 2010); The News Gap: When the Information Preferences of the Media and the Public Diverge (MIT Press, November 2013; co-authored with Eugenia Mitchelstein); Media Technologies: Essays on Communication, Materiality and Society (MIT Press, forthcoming in February 2014; co-edited with Tarleton Gillespie and Kirsten Foot); and over twenty journal articles and fifty conference presentations. His current major project, undertaken jointly with his doctoral students Eugenia Mitchelstein and Ignacio Siles, is an ethnographic study of the demise of print newspapers in Chicago, Paris, and Buenos Aires, as a window into larger dynamics of institutional decay.

Cesar Braga-Pinto

Cesar Braga-Pinto
Cesar Braga-Pinto (PhD, University of California Berkeley) specializes in Brazilian and Lusophone African cultures and literatures.

Sherwin Bryant

Sherwin Bryant
Sherwin K. Bryant (PhD, The Ohio State University) specializes in colonial Latin American history with a particular emphasis upon slavery and emancipation, race and difference, free black life in the Americas, and the modern African Diaspora.

Hector G. Carrillo

Hector G. Carrillo
With a focus on Mexico and Mexican immigrants, Héctor Carrillo (Sociology, Gender & Sexuality Studies) investigates the intersections between sexuality, immigration, and health. He also conducts research on the sexualities of non-gay identified men who are sexually attracted to both women and men. At Northwestern, Carrillo teaches courses on the sociology of sexualities, global sexual cultures, sexuality and public policy, and transnationalism. In 2013-14, Prof. Carrillo is the Interim director of the Latina and Latino Studies Program.

Francisco Castro

Francisco Castro
Francisco Castro (PhD, University of Texas at Austin) teaches 200-level Spanish language courses, and coordinates Spanish 102-3 in Fall.

Rifka Cook

Rifka Cook
Rifka Cook (M.A., Universidad Pedagógica Libertador in Linguistics) teaches first- and second-year Spanish language courses. She lived in a Caribbean Island (Margarita) for 20 years and was very involved with the insular community-- both Jewish and non-Jewish groups. In addition, Rifka is a Member of the Language Proficiency Committee (for Spanish language). She received two Residential College Fellow Assistant Research Awards (FARA) 2012-2013 with her project:  “Mafalda and El Chavo: Bridging Worlds” and in 2013-1014 with her project: “Merging the Borderline: music of  Venezuela and the American West”. In 2013 she was among the Technology Innovators Nominees Submitted by Readers – The Chronicle of Higher Education. In 2010-2011 was Faculty Affiliate of the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities . Her research interests and publications include the Judeo-Spanish language, Latin-American culture (Venezuela and the Caribbean), Teaching and learning styles; and using technology in foreign languages classrooms: PPT, Clickers.

Jorge Coronado

Jorge Coronado
Associate Professor and Chair Jorge Coronado (PhD, Columbia University), specializes in modern Latin American and Andean literatures and cultures. His courses range across the 19th and 20th centuries and draw from various disciplines and cultural practices, such as history, anthropology, political science, music, film, photography, and literature. His book, entitled The Andes Imagined: Indigenismo, Society, and Modernity, appeared in the Illuminations Series at the University of Pittsburgh Press in 2009. He has written articles on indigenismo, photography, and the avant-garde. He is currently working on The Andes Pictured: Photography and Lettered Culture, 1900-50 (under contract at University of Pittsburgh Press), a cultural history of photography in the southern Andes. At Northwestern, he has been active in building the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Latin American & Caribbean Studies Program.

Drew Davies

Drew Davies
Drew Edward Davies (PhD, University of Chicago) researches music and sound in New Spain (colonial Mexico) with attention to issues of transatlantic cultural diffusion and adaptation in cathedral repertoires. He has published and revived the compositions of Santiago Billoni, a Roman composer who worked in 1740s Durango, and frequently collaborates with performing musicians. He also participates in a long term workgroup at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México to catalogue and study colonial manuscripts at Mexico City Cathedral.

Jesús Escobar

Jesús Escobar
Jesús Escobar (PhD, Princeton) Professor Escobar is trained as architectural historian and explores the built and spatial environment of cities in the early modern Spanish world. His research and publications touch upon Spanish cities such as Madrid, Santiago de Compostela, and Seville, as well as other imperial centers such as Lima, Mexico City, Palermo, and Antwerp. His courses at Northwestern consider the breadth of cultural production in the Spanish Habsburg empire from printmaking and painting to architecture and urbanism.

Dario Fernandez

Dario Fernandez
Fernández Morera's (PhD, Harvard University) main fields are Comparative Literature and Golden Age Spanish literature. His writings include books and editions published in Europe and the United States, and articles and review articles in English and Spanish on critical discourses and methodology, cultural issues in Latin America, Spain, and the United States, contemporary political events, modern poetry, the encounter between Europeans and Amerindians, Modernism, Cervantes, Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, and Vicente Aleixandre.

Edward Gibson

Edward Gibson
Professor Gibson's (PhD, Columbia University) research and teaching interests include comparative politics, democratization, Latin American politics, and American Political Development. He is the author of Boundary Control: Subnational Authoritarianism in Federal Democracies (2012).  Boundary Control won the V.O. Key Award for the Best Book on U.S. Southern Politics, as well as the Latin American Studies Association’s Donna Lee Van Cott Award for best book in Latin American Political Institutions.   He is also author of Class and Conservative Parties: Argentina in Comparative Perspective (1996), and editor of Federalism and Democracy in Latin America (2004).  Professor Gibson has won several teaching recognitions, including Northwestern University’s John Deering McCormick Professorship in Teaching Excellence.

Mark W. Hauser

Mark W. Hauser
Mark Hauser's (PhD, Syracuse University) research is primarily concerned with inequality in (historical) context through things typical overlooked and left out of the documentary record.  Specifically, I have focused on the ways in which enslaved and freed peoples of African descent created and transformed social and economic landscapes within the context of Caribbean plantation societies. At the center of all of my research I have centered social theory articulated in the Caribbean, (Fanon, Winters, Williams, Ortiz, Goveia, and Rodney) and have tried to show their relevance to the study of ancient societies and political constellations of the more recent past.

Lucille Kerr

Lucille Kerr
Lucille Kerr (PhD, Yale): 20th century Latin American literature; Boom & post-Boom literary culture; Latin American Jewish literature & history; narrative fiction & theory; fiction & film; testimonial theories & texts; close reading

Laura M. Leon Llerena

Laura M. Leon Llerena
Laura M. Leon Llerena (PhD, Princeton University) specializes in Colonial Latin American Studies, with particular emphasis on Andean history and literature.

Emily A. Maguire

Emily A. Maguire
Emily A. Maguire (PhD, New York University): Caribbean literature and intellectual history; Race in the Americas; Latin American ethnography; science fiction and cyberpunk.

James L. Mahoney

James L. Mahoney
James Mahoney (PhD, University of California Berkley) Department of Political Science and Department of Sociology Professor Mahoney's interests include comparative-historical research and national development, political regimes, and qualitative methodology.

Michelle Molina

Michelle Molina
J. Michelle  Molina (PhD, University of Chicago) studies the Society of Jesus in the early modern period. Her book, To Overcome Oneself: The Jesuit Ethic and the Spirit of Global Expansion (University of California, 2013) explores Jesuit spirituality in an effort to understand how individuals – both elite and commoner – approached and experienced religious transformation. In particular, she has been interested in examining the impact of the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises – a meditative retreat geared toward self-reform – on early modern global expansion and the development of ideas about self and religious subjectivity in New Spain.

Paul Ramirez

Paul Ramirez
Paul Ramírez (PhD, University of California Berkeley) is a social and cultural historian of Mexico in the late colonial and national periods (roughly 1700-1900). His research centers on the ways stats interact with society through European and American intermediaries. His current book project, tentatively titled Minerva’s Mexico: Enlightenment Battles against Epidemic Disease, examines how theology, Catholic liturgy, priests, pastoral letters, rituals of statecraft, village politics, and indigenous families facilitated the adoption of new kinds of medical practice and knowledge toward the end of Mexico's colonial period, including inoculation and vaccination against smallpox. He has also published on shrine devotions in Mexico City and is currently undertaking a study of commodity production and Catholic confraternities in the regions of Puebla and Oaxaca in the nineteenth century.

Ramon Rivera-Servera

Ramon Rivera-Servera
Ramón H. Rivera-Servera's (PhD, University of Texas-Austin) has research focuses on contemporary (post-1950) performance in North America (Mexico, Canada, and the U.S.) and the Caribbean with special emphasis on the ways categories of race, gender, and sexuality are negotiated in the process of (im)migration. His work documents a wide array of performance practices ranging from theatre and concert dance to social dance, fashion, and speech.

Cynthia Robin

Cynthia Robin
Cynthia Robin is an anthropological archaeologist who studies everyday life, gender, and class in ancient Maya society.  Through her research she strives to show how ordinary people make a difference in society and are not the mere pawns of history or prehistory.  She has just completed a decade long project on the 2000 year history of the ancient Maya farming community of Chan.

Reuel R. Rogers

Reuel R. Rogers
Professor Rogers' (PhD, Princeton University) main interests are in American politics.  His research and teaching focus primarily on race, ethnicity, immigration, urban politics, political behavior, and African-American politics. He is the author of the award winning book, Afro-Caribbean Immigrants and the Politics of Incorporation: Ethnicity, Exception, or Exit (Cambridge University Press 2006).  His current research focuses on black suburbanization.

Monica Russel y Rodriguez

Monica Russel y Rodriguez
Monica Russel y Rodriguez is an ethnographer with broad disciplinary interests that include Anthropology, Latina/o Studies, Ethnic Studies, and Gender Studies. She works primarily with US Latina/o populations and larger questions of representation of Latinas/os in academe, public policy, and the media. Her interests are gender, sexuality, race and class in Latina/o communities.  Her research areas include Los Angeles, Denver, rural New Mexico, and Chicago and the Chicago suburbs.

Frank Safford

Frank Safford
Frank Safford's research deals primarily with economic and political topics in Spanish America in the nineteenth century. Much of his work deals with nineteenth-century Colombia. His most recent publication dealt with the formation of national states in Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Colombia, but he currently is writing a book focusing on the economy and entrepreneurial history in nineteenth-century Colombia.

Rebecca Seligman

Rebecca Seligman
Rebecca Seligman (PhD, Emory University) is a psychological and medical anthropologist whose research has explored the connection between mental health and religious participation in Brazil.  This research examines the ways in which political-economic and social structures of power shape the embodied subjectivities of many Afro-Brazilians in Salvador, capital of the Northeastern state of Bahia, and how participation in the spirit possession religion, Candomblé, positively affects health and well-being of Afro-Brazilian participants by reshaping their embodied selfhood. Her book based on this research is forthcoming.  Seligman’s current research explores the subjective experiences of Mexican youth in psychiatric treatment in the US, and will ultimately include a transnational comparative element examining adolescent psychiatry in Mexico and the US.

Micaela Smith

Micaela Smith, Visiting Faculty, 2013-14 (PhD, University of Southern California). Her research interests broadly include Modern Latin America, Afro-Brazil, Dependency Development and Latin American Economic History, Critical Race Theory and Urban Space, Gender and Sexuality, Regionalism and Nationalism. Her draft manuscript, A City in Transition: Blackness, Belonging, and the Development of an Afro-Brazilian Tourism Industry, Salvador da Bahia, Brazil, 1965-1985, examines Bahian tourism strategies highlighting Afro-Brazilian culture and history during a time in which an authoritarian regime produced some of the most extreme forms of poverty for Afro-Brazilian lived realities.

Krista Thompson

Krista Thompson
Krista Thompson (PhD, Emory University) is  in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University. She researches and teaches the art and visual culture in the Africa diaspora, with an emphasis on photography. She is author of An Eye for the Tropics (2006) and articles in American Art, Art Bulletin, Art Journal, Representations, The Drama Review, and Small Axe. Thompson, the recipient of fellowships and grants from the J. Paul Getty Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the Warhol foundation, is working on The Visual Economy of Light in African Diasporic Aesthetic Practice (forthcoming, Duke University Press) on the intersections among black vernacular forms of photography, performance practices, and contemporary art in the Caribbean and the United States and The Evidence of Things Not Photographed, a book that examines notions of photographic absence and disappearance in colonial and postcolonial Jamaica.

Maria Uslenghi

Maria Uslenghi
Maria Alejandra Uslenghi (PhD, New York University) specializes in 19th and 20th century Latin American Literature with an emphasis on visual culture and comparative modernisms studies. Other research interests include: travel narratives, theory of photography, geopolitics of modernism.

Mary Weismantel

Mary Weismantel
Professor, Department of Anthropology, Program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Mary Weismantel (PhD, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign). Professor Weismantel's research areas and interests include cultural anthropology, sex/gender, and race; her area of research and teaching expertise is Latin America generally and the Andean region in particular. Professor Weismantel is currently writing about sexuality, death, and the relationship between humans and animals as themes in the art of the ancient Moche, who created thousands of remarkable ceramics on the north coast of Peru between 200 and 800 C.E.