Archaeology

Mark W. Hauser

Mark W. Hauser

Program Area(s):  Atlantic World; Archaeology; African Diaspora; Caribbean

Mark is a historical archaeologist who specializes in materiality, slavery and inequality. These key themes intersect in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries Atlantic and Indian Oceans and form a foundation on his research on the African Diaspora and Colonial Contexts. As an archaeologist who studies how people adapt to landscapes of inequality and contribute to those landscapes in material ways he employs ethnohistorical, archaeological, and archaeometric approaches. His current fieldwork is based in the Eastern Caribbean and has focused on the environmental and economic relations developed through colonialism.

Cynthia Robin

Cynthia Robin

Program Area(s):  Mexico and Central America; Archaeology

Cynthia Robin is an anthropological archaeologist who studies everyday life, gender, and class in ancient Maya society.  Through her research she strives to show how ordinary people make a difference in society and are not the mere pawns of history or prehistory.  She has just completed a decade long project on the 2000 year history of the ancient Maya farming community of Chan.

Mary Weismantel

Mary Weismantel

Program Area(s):  The Andes; Gender and Sexuality; Race; Archaeology; Ethnography

Professor, Department of Anthropology, Program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Mary Weismantel (PhD, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign). Professor Weismantel's research areas and interests include cultural anthropology, sex/gender, and race; her area of research and teaching expertise is Latin America generally and the Andean region in particular. Professor Weismantel is currently writing about sexuality, death, and the relationship between humans and animals as themes in the art of the ancient Moche, who created thousands of remarkable ceramics on the north coast of Peru between 200 and 800 C.E.