Transnationalism/Globalization

Maria Akchurin

Program Area(s):  Transnationalism/Globalization; Politics; The Andes

Maria Akchurin, Buffett Postdoctoral Fellow, is a sociologist studying political processes around social and environmental policies in Latin America. Her dissertation research compares the privatization of urban water supply systems in Argentina and Chile from the late 1980s to the present, analyzing the implementation of the market paradigm in water and sanitation as well as social mobilization around water. In another recent project, she analyzed how the rights of nature were introduced into the Ecuadorian constitution. Her broader interests are in political sociology and mobilization, economy and society, and historical sociology.

Frances Aparicio

Frances Aparicio

Program Area(s):  Music; Immigration/Emigration; Transnationalism/Globalization; Literature

Frances R. Aparicio is Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Director of the Latina and Latino Studies Program at Northwestern University.   She has previously taught at Stanford University, University of Arizona, University of Michigan, and University of Illinois at Chicago.  Her research interests include Latina and Latino literary and cultural studies, the cultural politics of U.S. Latino/a languages, Latino/a popular music and dance, literary and cultural translation, cultural hybridity, transnationalism, Latinidad, and mixed Latino/a identities.  She is author of the award-winning Listening to Salsa:  Gender, Latin Popular Music and Puerto Rican Cultures (Wesleyan 1998), and co-editor of various critical anthologies, including Tropicalizations:  Transcultural Representations of Latinidad (University of New England Press, 1997), Musical Migrations (Palgrave, 2003), and Hibridismos culturales (Revista Iberoamericana, 2006).  A founding editor of the Latinos in Chicago and the Midwest Book Series at the University of Illinois Press, she has facilitated and fostered book publications and new research on Latino/as in the Midwest.  She is currently co-editor of the forthcoming Routledge Companion to Latino/a Literatures (with Suzanne Bost) and is also writing on “intralatino/a subjects,” individuals who are of two or more national Latin American origins.

Héctor G. Carrillo

Héctor G. Carrillo

Program Area(s):  Gender and Sexuality; Transnationalism/Globalization; History; Public Health; Immigration/Emigration

With a focus on Mexico and Mexican immigrants, Héctor Carrillo (Sociology, Gender & Sexuality Studies) investigates the intersections between sexuality, immigration, and health. He also conducts research on the sexualities of non-gay identified men who are sexually attracted to both women and men. At Northwestern, Carrillo teaches courses on the sociology of sexualities, global sexual cultures, sexuality and public policy, and transnationalism. In 2013-14, Prof. Carrillo was the Interim director of the Latina and Latino Studies Program. He currently is co-director of the Sexualities Project at Northwestern (SPAN).

Jesús Escobar

Jesús Escobar

Program Area(s):  Art and Architecture; Transnationalism/Globalization; Atlantic World

Jesús Escobar (PhD, Princeton) is an architectural historian and Chair of the Department of Art History. His research explores the built environment of the early modern Spanish world with publications touching on Spanish cities such as Madrid, Santiago de Compostela, and Seville, as well as other imperial centers such as Lima, Mexico City, Palermo, and Antwerp. His courses at Northwestern consider the breadth of cultural production in the Spanish Habsburg empire from printmaking and painting to architecture and urbanism.

Badi Foster

Badi Foster

    Program Area(s):  Transnationalism/Globalization

    Badi FosterBuffett Institute Visiting Scholar (PhD, Princeton University) has an extremely varied background, extending from higher education and nonprofits to the corporate world and federal government. Born in Chicago, Foster spent his adolescent years in Morocco. He earned his bachelors degree in international relations at the University of Denver and received his PhD in Politics from Princeton University. As a Fulbright fellow, his doctoral research focused on the impact of rapid urbanization in Africa. Foster has held several positions at Harvard University, including Director of Field Experience Program, Graduate School of Education and Assistant Director of the Kennedy Institute of Politics. Foster has also held teaching positions at Princeton University, Rutgers, and the University of Massachusetts. He currently serves on the Advisory Council to the Joan Kroc Center for International Peace Studies at Notre Dame University.  He is a Fellow at the W.E.B. Dubois Institute of African and African American Studies at Harvard University where he continues work on his book length manuscript on leadership and organizational change in the fight against anti Black and anti American Indian racism (1911-2011).

    Marcela A. Fuentes

    Marcela A. Fuentes

    Program Area(s):  Literature; Transnationalism/Globalization; Immigration/Emigration; Music; Politics

    Marcela Fuentes’s work focuses on the relationship between performance and digital technology in late 20th and early 21st century protest and interventionist art. Her book manuscript, In the Event of Performance: Bodies, Tactical Media, and Politics in the Americas, under contract with the University of Michigan Press, investigates the changing relationship between embodied performance and mediation as techniques of control and resistance within neoliberal states. Professor Fuentes’s teaching interests include politics and performance, performance art, social art tactics, transnational performance, theories of embodiment and affect, the digital humanities, and performance as research. Professor Fuentes’s work has been published in academic journals, edited volumes, and reference books. She serves as a Board Member of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics and has been a founding member and Managing Editor of e-misférica, the institute’s online peer-review journal. Professor Fuentes also works as a performer, director, and dramaturg.

    Michelle Molina

    Michelle Molina

    Program Area(s):  Colonialism; Transnationalism/Globalization; History; Mexico and Central America; Religion; Atlantic World

    J. Michelle  Molina (PhD, University of Chicago) studies the Society of Jesus in the early modern period. Her book, To Overcome Oneself: The Jesuit Ethic and the Spirit of Global Expansion (University of California, 2013) explores Jesuit spirituality in an effort to understand how individuals – both elite and commoner – approached and experienced religious transformation. In particular, she has been interested in examining the impact of the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises – a meditative retreat geared toward self-reform – on early modern global expansion and the development of ideas about self and religious subjectivity in New Spain.